DNA samples sought in search for remains after Camp Fire kills 56

    Summary
    Hundreds of rescue personnel dressed in white overalls sifted through smoldering rubble and mangled cars, searching for the remains of the victims of California's deadliest wildfire.

    Scientists confirm massive impact crater beneath Greenland's ice

    Summary
    A team of international researchers has verified the discovery of the first meteorite impact crater ever found deep beneath the Greenland ice sheet.

    Most excellent' airlines revealed for 2018

    Summary
    Air New Zealand gets regular kudos for innovating everything from in-flight services to safety videos, its funky films featuring Hobbits and other famous Kiwis.

    Relive country music's biggest night

    Summary
    A gender reveal, heartfelt tributes, big wins and more were seen at this year's Country Music Awards hosted by Carrie Underwood and Brad Paisley.

    May suffers setback as several UK government members resign over Brexit deal

    Summary

    Rohingya return to Myanmar: Confusion and fear in refugee camps

    Summary
    Refugees in crowded Bangladesh camps are waiting to hear whether they'll be sent back to Myanmar.

    Denmark withholds aid to Tanzania after anti-gay comments

    Summary
    A government minister says aid worth $9.8m will be withheld from Tanzania after anti-gay rhetoric.

    Monkey kills baby boy in India's Agra

    Summary
    The monkey entered a house in Agra and snatched the baby from his mother, who was breastfeeding him.

    Russia domestic abuse: 'My husband chopped off my hands'

    Summary
    Margarita Gracheva's case highlights fears that a change in Russia's laws may be emboldening abusers.

    UK PM faces grilling amid Brexit deal backlash

    Summary
    Cabinet ministers backed the agreement - but it has sparked a backlash from Tory Brexiteers.

    Uber loses $1bn in three months as growth slows

    Summary
    Uber has reported a quarterly loss of $1.07bn (£820m) as it pumped money into bikes, scooters and food deliveries.

    Frozen 'super-Earth' could support life, experts say

    Summary
    A frozen "super-Earth" discovered six light years from Earth could be capable of harbouring life, scientists have said.

    Massive asteroid crater found under ice in Greenland

    Summary
    An enormous crater believed to have been caused by an asteroid that slammed into Earth 12,000 years ago has been found beneath the ice in Greenland.

    Frightened Rohingya fleeing to avoid Myanmar return

    Summary
    Hussein Ahmed’s wife and children are missing.

    Trump lacked 'common decency', says French government

    Summary
    The French government has accused Donald Trump of lacking "common decency" after his Twitter tirade on the third anniversary of the Paris terror attacks.

    Minister in Charge of Japan’s Cybersecurity Says He Has Never Used a Computer

    Summary
    Yoshitaka Sakurada appeared not to know what a USB drive was, and told lawmakers that when it was necessary to use a computer, “I order my employees or secretaries” to do it.

    Ottawa Dispatch: Justin Trudeau’s Official Home: Unfit for a Leader or Anyone Else

    Summary
    The prime minister’s residence in Canada has been in bad shape for years, but in a country where it’s political poison for officials to spend money on themselves, the renovation debate rages on.

    Lawmakers Push Trump to Act Against China on Uighur Detention

    Summary
    Legislators have introduced bipartisan bills that urge the Trump administration to impose economic sanctions and take other measures to defend Uighurs.

    Who Rules YouTube? Swift? Bieber? Nope. It’s T-Series, a Record Label in India.

    Summary
    In 2016, hundreds of millions of people in India got internet access. They helped make T-Series the most watched YouTube channel in the world.

    How Facebook Wrestled With Scandal: 6 Key Takeaways From The Times’s Investigation

    Summary
    An investigation by The New York Times revealed how Facebook fought back against critics during a flood of crises — with delays, denials and an influence campaign in Washington.

    Bangladesh police detain scores of opposition supporters after violence

    Summary
    Bangladesh police on Thursday detained at least 60 supporters of the main opposition party following violence in the capital Dhaka, triggering accusations that the ruling party is trying to weaken its rivals ahead of a general election next month.

    French PM Philippe: We have to be ready for 'no-deal' Brexit

    Summary
    French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said on Thursday ongoing political uncertainty in Britain following the announcement of a deal with the EU on Brexit raised concerns about whether the agreement would end up being ratified.

    Germany's BDI: Our firms must still prepare for a chaotic Brexit

    Summary
    Germany's BDI industry association said on Thursday that it was too soon to breathe a sigh of relief on Brexit, that the situation in Britain was worrying and the ratification of "what looks like a sensible negotiation result" between Brussels and London was very uncertain.

    Factbox: UK PM May loses four more ministers after a year of resignations

    Summary
    Prime Minister Theresa May has suffered 18 resignations from her government since last November, ten of which have been related to her approach to Brexit. Here is the list:

    EU official says Brexit deal cannot be improved given 'red lines'

    Summary
    There is nothing better EU and UK negotiators can come up with for the Brexit deal given the mandates and red lines from both the bloc and London, a European Union official said on Thursday.

    3 members of U.K. leader's cabinet quit in massive blow to Brexit plans

    Summary
    Hours after PM Theresa May heralded progress in gaining her own cabinet's backing for her draft Brexit deal, the wheels appear to be coming off

    Aruba authorities probing American woman's death on Princess Cruises voyage

    Summary
    Investigators reportedly looking at 52-year-old passenger's death as possible murder

    Marie Antoinette's pearl pendant sells for record price

    Summary
    Before being killed on the guillotine, Marie Antoinette had secretly smuggled abroad some of her most treasured possessions to her relatives

    10-year-old tour guide charms tourists in Japanese garden

    Summary
    Takuto Kawakami passed a grueling English exam, and now practices speaking the language with tourists

    First group of migrants from Central American caravan reach U.S.-Mexico border

    Summary
    The first group of migrants from the Central American caravan are at America's doorstep. They split from a larger group of about 5,000 planning to request asylum in the U.S. CBS News correspondent John Blackstone is at the border.

    From the Archives: Opening of Burbank's Olive Avenue Bridge

    Summary
    Grand opening of new Olive Avenue Bridge over the Golden State Freeway.

    On election night, all anyone saw was a ripple. But the blue wave came and the Republicans wiped out.

    Summary
    It didn’t even look like a blue wave on election night. Now it’s looking like a potential tsunami, at least in California. As late votes poured in, largely from mailed ballots, the Democrats’ tally rose and swept away Republicans. What happened in the final days of the election season to generate...

    LeBron James gives Lakers reason to believe

    Summary
    If Los Angeles ever becomes LeBron James’ city, it will be because there are more nights like Wednesday night, nights when he imposes his physicality and intellect with such force that he demolishes any notion there is an active player his equal. What James did in the Lakers’ 126-117 victory over...

    Lakers' Rajon Rondo breaks his right hand in win over Trail Blazers

    Summary
    Lakers point guard Rajon Rondo broke his right hand during a 126-117 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Wednesday night, the team announced after the game. Lakers coach Luke Walton said Rondo would be out “for at least two weeks” and possibly longer once the team gives the backup point...

    For the Record

    Summary
    Gaza attacks: In the Nov. 13 Section A, an article about missile launches from the Gaza Strip said that civil servants in Gaza were not paid their full salaries because of Israel’s blockade. The Palestinian Authority, not Israel, cut funding for salaries in Gaza. School closures: In the Nov. 14...

    Iran executes men for hoarding gold coins amid currency crisis

    Summary
    Vahid Mazloumin and Mohammad Esmail Ghasemi were convicted of "spreading corruption on Earth" and executed by hanging.

    Latin Grammys, Thousand Oaks shooting memorial service, Florida recount: 5 things to know Thursday

    Summary
    The 2018 Latin Grammy Awards, lawsuits pile up ahead of Florida's recount deadline and more things to know to start your Thursday morning.

    Mattis: Bells' return to help US-Philippine ties

    Summary
    Three war-trophy bells seized by U.S. troops over a century ago got a send-off back to the Philippines on Wednesday by U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis, who called the controversial decision to repatriate them an important gesture of friendship between the two countries. (Nov. 15)

    S. Korea's 'Garlic Girls' accuse coaches of derailing team

    Summary
    South Korea's hugely popular Olympic curlers have accused their coaches of ruining the team with abusive treatment in a dispute that has spoiled one of the year's feel-good stories in sports.

    Weightlifting record-holder Lin banned 8 years for doping

    Summary
    A former world record-holding weightlifter has been banned for eight years in a doping case which caused confusion at the 2016 Olympics

    China and the U.S. Offer Rival Visions of the Pacific at the ASEAN Summit

    Summary
    (SINGAPORE) — The U.S. and China offered rival visions for the Asia-Pacific region Thursday at a summit of Southeast Asian nations whose economies and strategic interests are deeply entwined with both powers, with Vice President Mike Pence saying there was no room for “empire or aggression” in the region. Pence stressed the “steadfast and enduring” American commitment to the Indo-Pacific region as he met with leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations during their annual summit in Singapore. “Our vision for the Indo-Pacific excludes no nation. It only requires that every nation treat their neighbors with respect, they respect the sovereignty of our nations and the international rules of order,” Pence said in a veiled swipe at China’s growing influence and military expansion in the South China Sea. He is standing in for President Donald Trump at the ASEAN meeting and another summit later this week in Papua New Guinea. The ASEAN meetings focus on enhanced trade and security in a region of more than 630 million people. While in Singapore, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has sought to reassure China’s neighbors over its expanding reach, both economic and military, across the region. In a separate meeting with the ASEAN leaders, he urged them to help reassure world markets roiled by U.S. trade policies that have resulted in the imposition of punitive tariffs on billions of dollars’ worth of Chinese products, among other measures. Southeast Asian countries and others in the region share China’s consternation over the Trump administration’s rejection of multilateral trade regimes and the global trade system that has helped them modernize and enrich their economies. Many of the leaders attending the meetings in Singapore have emphasized the need to fight protectionism and protect the rules that help govern global trade. The region needs to “take concrete action to uphold the rules-based free trade regime and to send a message — a positive message — to the market to provide stable, predictable and law-based conditions for the market,” Li said. Managing conflict in the South China Sea is a perennial concern. China is pitted against its smaller neighbors in multiple disputes in the sea over coral reefs and lagoons in waters crucial for global commerce and rich in fish and potential oil and gas reserves. The region is a potential flashpoint, and a huge concern for the U.S. and other countries that rely on the right of passage for shipping. ASEAN leaders said they discussed the need for restraint in the area. “We all agreed on ways and means not to increase tensions in the South China Sea. And that means not bringing in warships and allowing for freedom of navigation,” Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamed told reporters. “Small patrol boats are needed to deal with piracy, mainly, but big warships may cause incidents and that will lead to tension.” Asked about the reaction by the U.S., which is committed by treaty to defending allies in the region, he said, “Mr. Pence sounds quite reasonable and he says that President Trump is concerned about the situation.” Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, who has relaxed his country’s stance on Chinese claims to islands also claimed by Manila, said it also was crucial that the countries involved finish work on a “code of conduct” to help prevent misunderstandings that could lead to conflict. “China is there. That is the reality,” he told reporters before joining the morning’s meetings. “Strong military activity will prompt a response from China. I do not mind everybody going to war, but except that the Philippines is just beside those islands. If there is shooting there my country will be the first to suffer.” The meetings Thursday followed scores of bilateral encounters among the leaders and talks on other issues such as environmental concerns, mechanisms for coping with disasters and the crisis over hundreds of thousands of ethnic Rohingya Muslims who have fled to Bangladesh to escape violence in Myanmar. While the gathering was typically focused on cooperation and goodwill, concerns over Myanmar’s treatment of its ethnic Rohingya Muslims flared with unusually sharp, public comments both by Pence and Mahathir to the country’s leader, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. More than 700,000 Rohingya have fled from western Myanmar’s Rakhine state to escape killings and destruction of their homes by the country’s military and vigilantes, drawing widespread condemnation and international accusations of genocide against Myanmar. Asked if Suu Kyi had agreed to his direct request that she pardon two Reuters’ journalists imprisoned in Myanmar, Pence replied, “We did not get a clear answer on that.” He said Suu Kyi had given some details on the appeals process and judicial handling of their cases. The ASEAN members are Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Its annual summit includes meetings with various other nations.

    Electronic Driving Systems Don’t Always Work, New Tests Show

    Summary
    (DETROIT) — Testing by AAA shows that electronic driver assist systems on the road today may not keep vehicles in their lanes or spot stationary objects in time to avoid a crash. The tests brought a warning from the auto club that drivers shouldn’t think that the systems make their vehicles self-driving, and that they should always be ready to take control. AAA also said that use of the word “pilot” by automakers in naming their systems can make some owners believe the vehicles can drive themselves. “These systems are made as an aid to driving, they are not autonomous, despite all of the hype around vehicle autonomy,” said Greg Brannon, AAA’s director of automotive engineering. “Clearly having ‘pilot’ in the name may imply a level of unaided driving, which is not correct for the current state of the development of these systems.” The test results released Thursday come after several highly publicized crashes involving Tesla vehicles that were operating on the company’s system named “Autopilot.” The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating some of the crashes, including a March fatality that involved a Model X that struck a freeway barrier near Mountain View, California. The AAA findings are the second tests showing that the systems can’t handle every situation in real-world driving, including some that are relatively common. In August, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety released tests that showed similar problems to the AAA study. The auto club tested the systems on four vehicles that had adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist and automatic emergency braking. Vehicles tested included the 2018 Mercedes-Benz S Class, the 2018 Nissan Rogue, a 2017 Tesla Model S and a 2019 Volvo XC40. In addition to Tesla’s Autopilot, Volvo calls its system “Pilot Assist,” while Nissan’s is named “ProPilot Assist.” Automakers generally say they tell drivers that their cars aren’t fully self-driving and that they should always be alert and ready to intervene. AAA says all four vehicles drifted out of lanes and hugged lane markers, struggling with moderate traffic, curved roads and streets with busy intersections. Three of the four would have failed to avoid a crash when the vehicle ahead of them changed lanes and a simulated stopped vehicle was ahead. “As a result we had to take evasive action,” said Brannon, who wouldn’t identify the vehicles that failed to stop in time. The vehicles’ owner’s manuals say that spotting a stationary vehicle after a lead vehicle changes lanes is a design limitation for the systems, Brannon said. But he said researchers expected the vehicles to see stopped vehicles and react in time. Automakers generally say that the systems are designed to supplement a human driver and they make it clear the vehicles don’t drive themselves. Nissan said its system name contains the word “assist,” showing that it’s designed to help the driver. “Mercedes-Benz has always stressed that this technology is designed to assist the driver, not to encourage customers to ignore their responsibilities as drivers,” the automaker said in a statement. Tesla says that it reminds drivers to keep their hands on the wheel. “Tesla has always been clear that Autopilot doesn’t make the car impervious to all accidents,” the company said in a statement earlier this year. A message was left Thursday seeking comment from Volvo. Brannon said that despite their shortcomings, the systems have great potential to save lives and stop crashes from happening. “Anything that can serve as a backstop to a good driver is going to enhance the safety of the system, of the driver,” he said.

    South Korea’s ‘Garlic Girls’ Have Accused Their Coaches of Derailing the Team

    Summary
    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Garlic Girls, South Korea’s hugely popular Olympic silver medalist curlers, accused their coaches Thursday of ruining the team with abusive treatment in a dispute that has spoiled one of the year’s feel-good sports stories.The women’s claims, if confirmed, suggest a familiar tale of abuse, corruption and nepotism that has regularly marred South Korea’s highly hierarchical elite sports scene. Men often run South Korean sports efforts, and while the team’s head coach is a woman, men in her family, including her father, a former leading figure in South Korean curling, play a prominent part in the team’s accusations of abuse. “We can no longer work with a coaching staff that is trying to divide the team,” Kim Seon-yeong said in a glum news conference in Seoul. The players also accused the coaching staff of skipping training sessions, holding back prize money and trying to force a married member off the team. “We need a coaching staff that can train and lead us properly. We want to continue our curling careers and aim for bigger goals at the Beijing Olympics,” Kim said. The news conference came a day after South Korea’s Sports Ministry and National Olympic Committee announced a joint investigation into allegations that became public after the athletes sent a letter outlining their complaints to sports authorities last week. The five-member women’s curling team became an overnight sensation after their improbable silver medal run in February’s Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. They enthralled a country that barely recognized curling before they made their run and became sought-after spokeswomen in commercials. Their nickname is a nod to the famous garlic produced in their hometown in Uiseong, in southern South Korea, where they met and began playing together as teenagers. In their letter to the Korean Sport and Olympic Committee last week, Kim Eun-jung, Kim Seon-yeong, Kim Cho-hee, and sisters Kim Yeong-ae and Kim Yeong-mi accused former Korean Curling Federation vice-president Kim Kyung-doo of verbal abuse and team coaches of giving unreasonable orders and subjecting their lives to excessive control. In Thursday’s news conference, the curlers said coaches instructed them what to say in interviews and closely monitored their private lives after training hours, scolding them if they met with athletes from rival teams. Letters and presents sent by fans “were already ripped open” before they reached the curlers, Kim Seon-yeong said. “We can’t understand why the head coach had to rip open and check the presents and letters sent to individuals before they reach the athlete,” she said. The curlers said the coaches withheld prize money and tried to sideline the married captain Kim Eun-jung after learning of her plans to start a family. They said the coaches also tried to force Kim Cho-hee off the team ahead of the Olympics to open a spot for head coach Kim Min-jung to participate as an athlete; they also said they had to endure a tirade from Kim Kyung-doo after they decided to stick with their teammate. Kim Kyung-doo and his family had extensive control over the team with his daughter, Kim Min-jung, being the head coach and his son-in-law, Jang Ban-seok, the mixed doubles coach. The curlers organized the news conference after the coaching staff publicly denied the accusations. “We had thought we could go together with that family, but after going through the Olympics, it became clear to us they were a family that cared only about themselves,” Kim Eun-jung said in the news conference. “They don’t want the athletes to grow and get better. … They don’t want the athletes to become bigger than the organization.” Jang denied funds were withheld from the athletes, saying the team had agreed prize money would be spent on overseas training and competitions, but Kim Eun-jung said the curlers were kept in the dark about how the money was used. “We were already receiving (state) training funds as members of the national team, and we couldn’t understand why the prize money was not being distributed to us,” she said.

    Winning Big at the CMAs, Chris Stapleton Honors the Victims of the Borderline Bar Shooting in California

    Summary
    Chris Stapleton is cleaning house, as usual, at the 2018 Country Music Association Awards. The singer-songwriter, who has won at the CMAs every year since 2015, picked up multiple awards during the show Wednesday night, including single and song of the year for his Grammy-winning hit, “Broken Halos.” When he won single of the year — where he won as a performer and producer — Stapleton said he was “thinking about the people in California right now” and he wants to “dedicate this award to them.” He was referring to the 12 people who were killed at a Southern California country music bar last week — who were also honored at the top of the show held at the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tennessee. Garth Brooks opened the CMAs by telling the audience that the event would be “dedicated to the 12 individuals who we lost far too soon just a week ago tonight at the Borderline in Thousand Oaks, California. “Tonight let’s celebrate their lives. Let the music unite us with love,” Brooks said. He then held a moment of silence as the names of the victims were displayed on the screen. The CMAs, airing live on ABC, also took time to speak about the deadly wildfires in California. “We send our love to you,” said co-host Carrie Underwood, also mentioning the “brave firefighters.” Underwood kept the positive and uplifting theme going when she gave a rousing performance of her song “Love Wins.” It features the lyrics, “I believe you and me are sisters and brothers/And I believe we’re made to be here for each other.” Dan + Shay, who lost in all four categories they were nominated in, gave an impressive performance of their hit “Tequila.” When Brothers Osborne won vocal duo of the year, John Osborne said, “I thought this was going to go to Dan + Shay. Make some noise for those boys.” “I don’t know why we keep winning this,” John Osborne said when he first walked onstage. “If this was in Florida there definitely would be a recount,” added T.J. Osborne, which earned laughs from the audience. Luke Combs, who has the year’s most-streamed country music album, sang onstage with a red cup in his hand and won new artist of the year. “God, I love country music, man,” said Combs. Brooks performed a touching new song dedicated to his wife, Trisha Yearwood, who was teary-eyed and was hearing the song for the first time. Recent Country Hall of Famer Ricky Skaggs performed alongside Brad Paisley and Keith Urban. Kacey Musgraves, who will perform later in the show, was the only woman nominated for album of the year and won the prize for “Golden Hour.” “This is really, really crazy timing — 10 years ago today I moved to Nashville. That’s so crazy,” she said. “I’m so proud it. It’s inspired by this beautiful universe, and all of you, and mostly love.” Underwood and Paisley returned as CMA hosts for the 11th time this year, telling jokes at the top of the show, which ranged from Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” to Underwood’s pregnancy. Underwood seemingly revealed a secret about the child, saying it will be a “Willie” after Paisley repeatedly asked about the sex of the baby. Stapleton walked in as the leading nominee with five, including a bid for entertainer of the year, where he will compete with Bryan, Aldean, Chesney and Urban. Underwood, who is nominated for female vocalist of the year, said it is tough picking between friends when it comes to voting. “When I vote, I legitimately try to look at who deserves it,” she said. “I know that you root for everybody, you’re glad that everybody’s there, you’re glad your friends are nominated for things, but I just try to think who’s killing it, who’s crushing it this year.”

    Monopoly for Millennials Is Here and People Are Not That Happy About It

    Summary
    Monopoly, the timeless game about owning property, has a new edition targeting the people infamous for their inability to do so: Millennials. Hasbro, the maker of the board game, has unveiled a new edition called Monopoly for Millennials, a twist on the original apparently targeted at the generation of people born between 1981-1996. On the cover of new edition, Rich Uncle Pennybags dons earphones, sunglasses, and a “participation” medal while taking a selfie. Below, the game’s tagline reads: “Forget real estate. You can’t afford it anyway.” “Money doesn’t always buy a great time, but experiences, whether they’re good — or weird — last forever,” reads the game’s description. So rather than collect cash and real estate, as in traditional versions, players collect experiences such as dining at a vegan bistro or doing a meditation retreat—or simply staying in their parents’ basement. “Adulting is hard. You deserve a break from the rat race!” the blurb adds. Game pieces include a crying emoji and a hashtag. But the game has drawn mixed reactions. Many millennials are offended while others find it hilarious and jeer at any negative reaction as a classic instance of millennials being coddled. Millennials mad about Millennial Monopoly is the most Millennial thing. https://t.co/EDiMFKu5gx — Reggie Aqui (@reggieaqui) November 14, 2018 Others find the jokes overdone and point to the massive levels of student debt burdening many young adults. Let’s play a game of MILLENNIAL MONOPOLY. The rules are simple, you start with no money, you can’t afford anything, the board is on fire for some reason and everything is your fault. — TechnicallyRon (@TechnicallyRon) May 6, 2018 What?! @Hasbro's #Millennial Monopoly says "forget real estate, you cant afford it anyway." Hopefully they'll be donating the proceeds to student debt relief. (which is why millennials can't afford real estate) https://t.co/Xw1Vmo9tNE — Emily Roehler (@EmilyRoehler) November 12, 2018 @Hasbro ain’t shit lmfao Hahahaha Millennial Monopoly making fun of the struggles of millennials. You are aware that student debt and the rising cost of rent is crippling the economy 🤦🏾‍♂️🤦🏾‍♂️. Talking about idiotic. — Goodie (@Heygood4U) November 13, 2018 Hasbro stood by its decision to make the game, saying that some of its staff were millennials, according to a statement given to Fortune. “We created Monopoly for Millennials to provide fans with a lighthearted game that allows Millennials to take a break from real life and laugh at the relatable experiences and labels that can sometimes be placed on them … Whether you are a lifestyle vlogger, emoji lover or you make your ‘side hustle’ selling vegan candles, Monopoly for Millennials is for you!” The game is available at Walmart for $19.82.

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