Facebook perfects the art of the news dump

    Summary
    On the Thursday before a major holiday weekend, and an hour before the much-anticipated Mueller report was released to the public, Facebook updated a month-old blog post titled "Keeping Passwords Secure" with a few lines of italicized text.

    Oprah will not spend money on avocados

    Summary
    Oprah Winfrey's avocado toast is not like yours.

    Couple could face death penalty over 'sea home'

    Summary
    An American bitcoin trader and his girlfriend could face the death penalty after they were accused of threatening Thailand's sovereignty by building and living in a "sea home" off the coast of Phuket.

    If your image is online, it might be training facial-recognition AI

    Summary
    The photo is undeniably cute: a mom and a dad — he with a stubbly beard and rimless glasses, she with choppy brown hair and a wide grin — goofing around and eating ice cream with their two toddler daughters.

    Abrupt change may jeopardize future NFLer's career

    Summary

    Leica China video sparks backlash over Tiananmen Square image

    Summary
    Chinese social media users have called for a boycott of the brand following the release of the video.

    Snakes force Liberian President George Weah out of office

    Summary
    President George Weah is working from home after two black snakes were found in his office building.

    South Africa hit by deadly Easter church collapse

    Summary
    At least 13 worshippers are killed when a wall collapses at the start of an Easter service.

    Saudi sisters in Georgia: 'We were treated like slaves'

    Summary
    The latest Saudi women to flee the kingdom travelled to Georgia, where they appealed for help online.

    National Enquirer sold to US magazine distributor

    Summary
    The tabloid has been embroiled in recent high-profile scandals involving Donald Trump and Jeff Bezos.

    Well-known mountain climbers feared dead after Canada avalanche

    Summary
    Three well-known mountain climbers are presumed dead after they were caught in an avalanche in Canada's Rocky Mountains earlier this week.

    911 call that exposed parents' torture of a dozen children released

    Summary
    A recording of the 911 call that alerted police to a couple who starved and locked up some of their 13 children has been released.

    Indian man cuts off his own finger in anger after voting for wrong party

    Summary
    An Indian man has cut off his own finger after accidentally voting for the wrong party in his country's election.

    At least 13 killed as church wall collapses during Easter service

    Summary
    At least 13 people have been killed after part of a church collapsed in South Africa, according to local media.

    Dingoes drag 14-month-old baby out of caravan as his parents sleep

    Summary
    A father has saved his baby son from being dragged away by a pack of wild dogs at an Australian holiday home.

    Sri Lankans Accuse Him of Wartime Atrocities. California May Decide.

    Summary
    Gotabaya Rajapaksa oversaw the final stages of a civil war that ended in 2009. He could be liable for civil damages if American judges find him guilty of murder and torture.

    Father Saves Toddler After Dingo Drags Him Away From Sleeping Family

    Summary
    The 14-month-old boy suffered a fractured skull and puncture wounds in the attack by a dingo on Fraser Island in Australia, where the wild dogs have attacked people three times this year.

    Robert Mueller, Londonderry, Sylvia Hatchell: Your Friday Briefing

    Summary
    Here’s what you need to know.

    After Social Media Bans, Militant Groups Found Ways to Remain

    Summary
    Hezbollah and other groups classified as terrorist organizations by the United States have changed their social media strategies to stay on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

    Lyra McKee, Northern Ireland Journalist, Is Killed in ‘Terrorist Incident,’ Police Say

    Summary
    The police said that Ms. McKee, who died while reporting on unrest in Londonderry, had been shot by a militant republican, raising fears of renewed sectarian conflict.

    Montenegrin authorities seize drugs on navy training ship

    Summary
    Montenegrin military police have seized around 50 kilograms of drugs on board a naval training ship, hours before it was scheduled to take students on a training cruise, the defence ministry and local media said on Friday.

    White House says Trump spoke to Libyan commander Haftar on Monday

    Summary
    The White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump spoke by phone on Monday to Libyan military commander Khalifa Haftar and discussed "ongoing counterterrorism efforts and the need to achieve peace and stability in Libya."

    Emma Thompson, weeping teenagers join peaceful climate protest in London

    Summary
    Film star Emma Thompson joined climate change activists in central London on Friday to read poetry praising Earth's bounties, part of a series of protests which have caused transport snarl-ups in the British capital.

    Hundreds of thousands back on Algeria's streets, demanding radical reform

    Summary
    Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators returned to Algeria's streets on Friday to press demands for wholesale democratic change well beyond former president Abdelaziz Bouteflika's resignation, chanting "we do what we want", witnesses said.

    Turkey arrests suspected spies for UAE, investigating Khashoggi link

    Summary
    Turkey has arrested two suspects who confessed to spying on Arab nationals for the United Arab Emirates, and is investigating whether the arrival in Turkey of one of them was related to the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a senior Turkish official said on Friday.

    Electrical short eyed as possible Notre Dame blaze cause: Report

    Summary
    Authorities say fire-weakened landmark is still very fragile but officials are in very beginning stages of mapping reconstruction

    American among 3 climbers presumed dead after avalanche

    Summary
    Recovery efforts are on hold because of dangerous conditions and additional avalanches at Alberta's Banff National Park

    CIA Director Gina Haspel praises Trump's "wisdom" on North Korea

    Summary
    "I am very proud that we've been able to support this administration's effort to engage the North Koreans in a dialogue"

    Petition seeks to make Earth Day a national holiday

    Summary
    The North Face wants people to be able to celebrate Earth Day outside, rather than in front of screens

    Father and daughter in Notre Dame photo found

    Summary
    The search is over for the father-daughter duo captured in a heartwarming photo

    Forest bathing, or how you can experience nature without getting wet

    Summary
    Forest bathing might sound like a synonym for skinny-dipping. Instead, it’s spending time in a forested area (fully clothed) and soaking up the atmosphere — a metaphorical bathing of your senses in the forest. In Japan, the practice of shinrin-yoku, which means “forest bathing,” has been recognized...

    Don’t let business groups rewrite California's landmark privacy law

    Summary
    Last summer, after years of inaction on consumer privacy by the federal government and slipshod privacy protection by big businesses collecting personal data, the California Legislature took matters into its own hands. The California Consumer Privacy Act, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in June, is...

    Want the West Coast’s best in opera? You have to go to Europe

    Summary
    How would have Yuval Sharon’s bewildering new production of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” gone over in Los Angeles? That was the first thing that crossed my mind as I walked out of the opera house and into a Berlin rain on a frigid day in March. Sharon, the ever disruptive artist-collaborator of the...

    Review: ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ gets splash-happy in La Mirada

    Summary
    Squeaks of anticipation greet the opening strains of familiar songs at a local revival of the stage musical “Singin’ in the Rain,” adapted from the 1952 MGM movie that keeps Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor dancing forever in our memories. “Make ’Em Laugh.” “Moses Supposes.” “Good...

    Trump shouldn't be impeached, even though he probably committed impeachable offenses

    Summary
    To the editor: “In other words, there was no evidence of the Trump campaign collusion with the Russian government’s hacking.” Was this summary finding of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report by Atty. Gen. William Barr his own personal spin or a White House directive? (“Mueller’s report...

    Vladimir Putin's team doesn't like Robert Mueller's report on election interference, Trump

    Summary
    Kremlin seeks to downplay the findings of the special counsel on Russia's election activity in the United States.

    Trio of North Face climbers presumed dead in avalanche at Canada's Banff park

    Summary
    American Jess Roskelley and Austrians David Lama and Hansjorg Auer were attempting to climb Howse Peak in Canada's Banff National Park, officials say.

    Hall of Fame coach Sylvia Hatchell resigns at North Carolina after investigation into conduct

    Summary
    North Carolina coach Sylvia Hatchell resigned after an investigation found, among other things, that she made racially insensitive remarks to players.

    Harry and Meghan's royal baby: What we know, what we don't know, and why

    Summary
    Duchess Meghan's American royal baby will be unprecedented, but she and Prince Harry aren't answering all questions, including where it will be born.

    Why you should avoid raking grass clippings after mowing the lawn, and more mower taboos

    Summary
    You could be losing money and wasting time doing something that doesn't benefit your yard.

    Bangladesh Protesters Demand Justice for Girl Burned to Death After Refusing to Drop Sexual Harassment Charges

    Summary
    (DHAKA, Bangladesh) — Dozens of protesters gathered in Bangladesh’s capital on Friday to demand justice for an 18-year-old woman who died after being set on fire for refusing to drop sexual harassment charges against her Islamic school’s principal. Nusrat Jahan Rafi told her family she was lured to the roof of her rural school in the town of Feni on April 6 and asked to withdraw the charges by five people clad in burqas. When she refused, she said her hands were tied and she was doused in kerosene and set alight. Rafi told the story to her brother in an ambulance on the way to the hospital and he recorded her testimony on his mobile phone. She died four days later in a Dhaka hospital with burns covering 80% of her body. The violence has shaken Bangladesh, triggering protests and raising concerns over the plight of women and girls in the conservative Muslim-majority nation of 160 million people where sexual harassment and violence are often unreported, victims are intimidated and the legal process is often lengthy. Many avoid reporting to police because of social stigma. “We want justice. Our girls must grow up safely and with dignity,” Alisha Pradhan, a model and actress, told The Associated Press during Friday’s demonstration. “We protest any forms of violence against women, and authorities must ensure justice.” Tens of thousands of people attended Rafi’s funeral prayers in Feni, and Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina promised Rafi’s family when they met in Dhaka that those responsible would be punished. At least 17 people, including students, have been arrested in connection with the case, said Banaj Kumar Majumder, the head of the Police Bureau of Investigation. In late March, Rafi filed a complaint with police that the principal of her madrasa, or Islamic school, had called her into his office and touched her inappropriately and repeatedly. Her family agreed to help her to file the police complaint, which prompted police to arrest the principal, infuriating him and his supporters. Influential local politicians backed the principal, and ruling party members were also among the arrested. Police said the arrested suspects told them during interrogations that the attack on Rafi was planned and ordered by the school’s principal from prison when his men went to see him. It was timed for daytime so that it would look like a suicide attempt, Majumder said. Human Rights Watch said in a statement that Rafi’s family said that they had received death threats before the attack telling them to drop the case. While Rafi’s case is now being treated with urgency, that wasn’t the case until her death. A video taken on March 27 while Rafi reported the assault shows the local police chief registering her complaint but telling her that the incident was “not a big deal.” The chief was later removed from the police station for negligence in dealing with the case. For Bangladeshi women, it is often not easy to file sensitive complaints with police. Victims often fear further harassment and bullying. Police also often show an unwillingness to investigate such cases and are often accused of being influenced by local politics or bribes. But the call for dealing with violence against women, especially related to sexual harassment and assault, is also getting louder. “The horrifying murder of a brave woman who sought justice shows how badly the Bangladesh government has failed victims of sexual assault,” said Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Nusrat Jahan Rafi’s death highlights the need for the Bangladesh government to take survivors of sexual assault seriously and ensure that they can safely seek a legal remedy and be protected from retaliation.”

    Want to Live Longer? Science Says to Do These 5 Things

    Summary
    When it comes to staying healthy, most people have the same motivation: living as long and fulfilling a life as possible. And while science has yet to find a true fountain of youth, researchers have identified certain behaviors that can increase longevity. One study, published in the journal *Circulation *last year, even argued that adhering to just five healthy habits could extend your lifespan by roughly a decade. Here’s what they are, and what research to date says about living your longest life. Eating a healthy diet Diet is strongly linked to longevity. Research has long suggested that following a Mediterranean diet — which includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and healthy fats, and not much sugar, red meat or processed food — brings a host of health benefits, including a longer life. Other studies have also found longevity benefits associated with some of the specific foods and nutrients included in a Mediterranean diet, such as whole grains, fiber, fish, plant-based proteins and healthy fats. On the other hand, foods including processed snacks and meats, fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages have been linked to higher risks of chronic disease and death. Even if your diet isn’t perfect, research suggests that making smart changes can add up to sizable benefits. One paper published in 2017 concluded that people who ate 20% more healthy foods than they had at the beginning of the study, over the course of 12 years, decreased their risk of early death by up to 17%. Exercising regularly Working out regularly is a boon for both your physical and mental health, boosting everything from cardiovascular fitness to mood and energy — so it’s no surprise that it can also extend your life. Federal physical activity guidelines recommend aiming for at least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity each week, plus twice-weekly muscle-strengthening sessions, to reap health and longevity benefits. But you don’t have to go overboard. Even short bouts of light physical activity, such as walking and cleaning, increased the lifespans of older men and women in studies from 2018 and 2017, respectively. And a study published in January found that simply moving instead of sitting for 30 minutes each day could reduce early death risk by 17%. If you do opt for a more vigorous workout, some research suggests that team sports like tennis and soccer are best for longevity, because they encourage social interaction as well as exercise. And if you don’t exercise now, you can still start. A recent study found longevity benefits associated with both life-long and later-in-life exercise. Maintaining a healthy body weight Diet and exercise habits help people maintain a healthy body weight, which the *Circulation *study defined as a body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9. Obesity is associated with chronic conditions including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, all of which can shorten your life. A 2018 study found that widespread obesity shaved a year off the U.S. life expectancy and is responsible for up to 186,000 deaths per year. Drinking only in moderation For years, moderate drinking was touted as a harmless — and maybe even healthy — habit. But recently, scientific opinion has begun to shift toward a more cautious stance on alcohol. Last year, a large meta-analysis of prior alcohol studies concluded that there is no safe amount of drinking, because the net risks to a population — addiction, cancer, traffic accidents and so on — outweigh any potential benefits, such as improved cardiovascular and cognitive health. And while each person’s risk-benefit analysis depends on his or her family and medical history, research is increasingly supporting the idea that people should limit their alcohol consumption to avoid health problems and increase longevity. Moderate drinking, according to federal dietary guidelines, means that women should have no more than a drink per day, and men should have no more than two per day. Not smoking In addition to causing lung cancer, cigarette-smoking is associated with serious health problems including heart attack, stroke and mouth and throat cancers, making it a significant threat to longevity. The best way to reduce your risk, of course, is never to smoke at all — but if you do, experts advise quitting as soon as possible to minimize threats to your health.

    House Democrats Issue Subpoena for Full Mueller Report

    Summary
    House Democrats have formally issued a subpoena for the full contents of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on interference in the 2016 election. It’s the first official step in what will likely become a legal showdown between Congress and the Trump Administration. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, who chairs the judiciary committee, announced Friday morning that he was sending a subpoena to the Department of Justice for both the un-redacted report and all underlying evidence. The Department of Justice has until May 1 to comply. Although Nadler’s committee is conducting multiple probes of the Trump Administration, this is the first subpoena he has issued since he assumed the gavel in January. “I am open to working with the Department to reach a reasonable accommodation for access to these materials, however I cannot accept any proposal which leaves most of Congress in the dark, as they grapple with their duties of legislation, oversight and constitutional accountability,” Nadler said in a statement. The subpoena comes less than 24 hours after Attorney General William Barr released a redacted version of Mueller’s report to both the public and Congress. The report was redacted based on four categories: material from grand jury testimonies, material that could compromise intelligence sources and methods, material relating to current investigations, and “information that would unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.” This morning, @HouseJudiciary has issued a subpoena to the Department of Justice for the full the Mueller report and the underlying materials. DOJ is required to comply with that subpoena by May 1. pic.twitter.com/nzu9O5CC36 — (((Rep. Nadler))) (@RepJerryNadler) April 19, 2019 The Justice Department has set up a briefing later in the month for officials with top clearance to view the redacted information. But Congressional Democrats say they should have access to the full report, an argument that reached a fever pitch after Mueller appeared to toss the question of whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in the investigation to Congress. “I think it was probably written with the intent of providing Congress a roadmap, as other reports have in the past.” Nadler said on Thursday. “With a lot of the redactions and others Attorney General Barr seems to be trying to frustrate that intent. Often a subpoena is used as a negotiating tool to coerce both sides to reach an agreement without a court fight. But veterans of past legal showdowns between Congress and the executive branch are confident this one will reach the courts. Experts say the Justice Department can cite legal precedent for withholding some of the materials the Democrats are requesting, like grand jury testimony. “I would expect that even if the Justice Department decides to provide flexibility on some matters – for instance national security redactions – with respect to grand jury material I am sure they will take the position that they don’t have the discretion to release that information,” said one former House attorney, who requested anonymity given the sensitivity of the matter. “The only way to solve that would be to go to court if the committee wants to get access to that material.”

    Ancestry Pulls Ad After Criticism That It Romanticized Slavery

    Summary
    The DNA testing company Ancestry has taken down an ad showing a white man and a black woman who are in love attempting to escape what appears to be the the Civil War-era South. The 30-second commercial, entitled “Inseparable,” shows the couple running to a secluded spot. “Abigail, we can escape to the North,” the man tells the woman. “There’s a place we can be together across the border. Will you leave with me?” As the ad ends, text appears on the screen saying, “Without you, the story stops here.” Backlash was swift as critics accused the company of offering a romanticized version of American history. Most biracial or multiracial children born at the time were products of rape of women by slave owners, research has found. While it’s true that 1 in 4 black folks who test their male line through DNA end up finding a white man, it ain’t because of no damn slavery love story. I’m so tired of y’all. https://t.co/UwknpDDniL — Ida Bae Wells (@nhannahjones) April 18, 2019 Interracial coercion and sex was widespread in the Antebellum South, where slave owners often propositioned girls in their teens, according to an article in the *Journal of African American History*. A 2016 study looking at the history in the DNA of African Americans today found evidence that white slave owners fathered children with the women they held as slaves in a common practice that appeared to cease around the end of the Civil War. What the hell is this @Ancestry? Why do white people insist on romanticizing my Black female ancestors experiences with white men during slavery? They were raped, abused, treated like animals, beaten, and murdered by white men. Stop with the revisions.pic.twitter.com/cDEWdkzJPm — Bishop Talbert Swan (@TalbertSwan) April 18, 2019 Ancestry took the ad down from its YouTube channel. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment. In a statement to CBS News, the company said: “Ancestry is committed to telling important stories from history. This ad was intended to represent one of those stories. We very much appreciate the feedback we have received and apologize for any offense that the ad may have caused. We are in the process of pulling the ad from television and have removed it from YouTube.”

    This Puppy’s Guilty Face Trapped in a Blanket Jail of Its Own Making Is the Ultimate Mug Shot

    Summary
    It’s not news to anyone that no luxury item is safe around a puppy, and this latest viral incident is very special proof. That was never more hilariously evident than on Thursday night when Washington *Post* food editor Mary Beth Albright’s seven-month-old dog Zelda chewed through a blanket, creating a hole she inevitably got stuck in. She made the most sympathetic guilty face imaginable, and the result of this storyline is a mug shot that has captivated the collective minds of the internet. “It was worth it,” Mary Beth Albright captioned a second picture of the dog, which almost appeared to be smirking at the shenanigans. It was almost like being put in a pillory. Her face says it all. No dog on earth is more thrilled about pulling off a zany scheme than Zelda. Naturally, the internet took this image and ran with it. It’s garnered more than 60,000 likes. With eyes you could fall right into, and a head stuck in a booby trap of his own making, it was a smash. I chewed a hole through Mary Beth’s nicest blanket while she was working and now my head is stuck please help me pic.twitter.com/NVVWnarylx — Mary Beth Albright (@MaryBeth) April 18, 2019 It was worth it pic.twitter.com/UyLKKqYO9m — Mary Beth Albright (@MaryBeth) April 18, 2019 Fine, but how do I monetize? pic.twitter.com/lr9iWgD2wE — Mary Beth Albright (@MaryBeth) April 19, 2019

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