NBA trade that was called off finally goes through

    Summary

    How did girl die in US custody, family asks

    Summary
    Jakelin Caal Maquin jumped up and down when her father told her they're leaving their impoverished Guatemalan village for the United States. When the rest of her family sent them off, nobody imagined it'd be the last time they saw the 7-year-old girl alive.

    Opinion: How May can get out of Brexit hell

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    FBI releases document that intel officials used to brief Trump on dossier

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    The FBI on Friday released a redacted version of the memo that top intelligence officials, including former FBI Director James Comey, used to brief President Donald Trump about the compilation of information detailing his possible connections to Russia -- a document which came to be known as the Trump dossier.

    What's driving Britain's broken boys to crime?

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    After a long day at work, Tilisha Goupall returned to her London home, made dinner and switched on the TV, just like any other night. It was after 10.30 p.m. that she realized her 15-year-old brother, Jermaine, was more than an hour late home from the movies, so she sent him a message on Snapchat. He never read it.

    US returns looted bells to Philippines after 117 years

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    The Balangiga church bells have been returned to the Philippines, 117 years after the US seized them.

    Egypt: 'One of a kind' tomb found in Saqqara

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    The tomb, filled with hieroglyphs and statues, has been untouched for 4,440 years.

    Catholic priest at teenager's funeral condemns suicide

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    Father Don LaCuesta questioned whether the 18-year-old man would enter heaven, horrifying his family.

    Egypt tomb: Saqqara 'one of a kind' discovery revealed

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    Archaeologists in Egypt unveil the tomb of a high priest, untouched for 4,400 years.

    Katowice: UN climate talks stand-off continues

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    Climate talks are in an extra day as negotiators try to agree the next steps for the Paris agreement.

    Yellow vest protesters defy government after Strasbourg shooting

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    Thousands of protesters have been on the streets of France for the fifth weekend of demonstrations against the government.

    Clashes and 148 arrests - but French protests wane

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    Thousands of protesters have been on the streets of France for the fifth weekend of demonstrations against the government.

    Body of newborn baby found on beach in Ireland

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    The body of a newborn baby has been found on a beach on Ireland's east coast.

    4,400-year-old tomb found in Egypt - and it may have hidden treasure

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    A 4,400-year-old tomb has been discovered in Egypt - with its treasures set to be exposed in the coming days.

    Trump exodus continues as interior secretary departs

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    US interior secretary Ryan Zinke is to leave the White House at the end of the year, says Donald Trump.

    Seven Civilians Killed as Indian Police Fire on Kashmir Protesters

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    Dozens of others were injured when Indian security forces fired at people protesting the killing of three militants in a gun battle in Kashmir on Saturday, the police said.

    Afghan President Slaps Aide After Elite Guards Assault Petitioner

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    The opening of a new economic corridor should’ve brought President Ashraf Ghani positive news. But video from the event shows a confrontation that turned chaotic.

    Ukraine Asserts Major Russian Military Buildup on Eastern Border

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    Ukrainian officials have raised alarms about Russian military activity along the countries’ border, though Western analysts have been cautious.

    Paris Is Fortified as 5th Week of ‘Yellow Vests’ Protests Brings Scuffles and Tear Gas

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    Shops are boarded up and museums closed, and 90 people had been arrested by noon. But on a bitterly cold day, protests began more calmly than in recent weeks.

    Mexico City Dispatch: Virgin of Guadalupe Is ‘No. 1 Mother’ in Mexico, a Binding Force Across Divides

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    It is hard to overstate the singular importance of the Virgin of Guadalupe to the Mexican identity. Nowhere is the country’s devotion more apparent than at a yearly pilgrimage.

    Kremlin should take the lead on rap music, not shut it down, Putin says

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    Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Saturday the Kremlin should play a leading role in Russian rap music and in youth culture, rather than trying to shut it down.

    Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as Israel's capital, embassy not moving yet

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    Australia formally recognizes west Jerusalem as Israel's capital, reversing decades of Middle East policy, but will not move its embassy there immediately, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Saturday.

    Brazil faith healer accused of sexual abuse ruled a fugitive

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    A Brazilian faith healer accused of sexual abuse by more than 300 women is now considered a fugitive after failing to report to authorities on Saturday.

    Ukraine Su-27 fighter crashes, pilot killed - statement

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    A Ukrainian Su-27 fighter aircraft crashed while attempting to land on Saturday afternoon during a scheduled flight, killing the pilot, the Ukrainian military said.

    Zambia denies White House claim China taking over power utility

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    Zambia has denied claims by a White House official that China is about to take over its state power utility to recover $6-10 billion debt, noting the utility was never provided as collateral and its debt to Beijing was only $3.1 billion.

    Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as the capital of Israel

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    But it won't move its embassy until there's a peace settlement between Israel and the Palestinians, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said

    Scuffles erupt during fifth weekend of "yellow vest" Paris protests

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    At least 21 people were detained in Paris before the protests began, police said

    Paris braces for fifth weekend of protests over economic inequality

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    French President Emmanuel Macron laid a white rose at the monument in Strasbourg Friday for the four people killed in this week's Christmas market attack. It comes as Macron ordered increased security including police in riot gear to stand guard in Paris as anti-government protesters are back on the march. Roxana Saberi reports from Paris, France.

    Migrant girl's death in custody prompts federal probe

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    A federal investigation has been launched into the death of a 7-year-old girl who was in the custody of U.S. border agents. She was part of a group from Guatemala that surrendered at the border eight days ago. CBS News justice and homeland security correspondent Jeff Pegues reports.

    DHS watchdog investigating death of 7-year-old migrant girl

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    The watchdog said it would provide a final report to DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Congress and the public

    Frank Oz, Paul Williams and David Goelz remember 'Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christmas,' the Jim Henson-directed Muppet musical

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    Emmet Otter is not the most famous Muppet in Jim Henson’s universe of characters. But Hollywood will still embrace the occasional second act, and the leader of the Frogtown Hollow Jubilee Jug Band in 1977 TV special “Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christmas” is now a part of the revival circuit. Four decades...

    That Texas judge’s ‘insane’ ruling that Obamacare is unconstitutional could leave the law fatally wounded — or even stronger

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    More than 130 million Americans are waking up this Saturday morning to the news that their health coverage has been thrown into doubt. That’s because, late Friday night, a federal judge in Texas ruled that the Affordable Care Act — including its exchange health plans, Medicaid expansion and its...

    Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, under cloud of scandal, forced out

    Summary
    Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who endeared himself to President Trump but was caught up in scandals and infuriated environmental activists, will be departing his post by the end of the year in the latest shake-up of the president’s Cabinet. “Secretary of the Interior @RyanZinke will be leaving...

    How historian John Guy and ‘House of Cards’s Beau Willimon read between the lines of history to rewrite ‘Mary Queen of Scots’ legacy

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    For centuries, history had not been kind to Mary Stewart, Queen of Scots — a mistreatment that director Josie Rourke aimed to correct with her revisionist 16th century drama “Mary Queen of Scots.” Vilified by the enemies who orchestrated her downfall and beheaded for treason at the age of 44, Mary’s...

    Review: Bring your big wig and killer heels to the theatrical party that is ‘The Legend of Georgia McBride’

    Summary
    To misquote Shakespeare: Some men are born for drag, some achieve drag, and some have drag thrust upon ’em. Casey, the protagonist of Matthew Lopez’s irresistible 2015 comedy “The Legend of Georgia McBride,” is firmly in the third camp. How does somebody accidentally do drag? That’s exactly what...

    After initial deal fell through, Suns trading Trevor Ariza to Wizards for Austin Rivers, Kelly Oubre

    Summary
    A day after a three-team trade fell through over confusion about a player involved, the Wizards and Sun agreed to a deal sending Trevor Ariza to D.C.

    NFL Week 15 matchups: Will Patriots or Steelers take another hit to playoff seeding hopes?

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    The Patriots and Steelers' clash on Sunday will mark the first game since 1993 that both are coming off a loss, and the stakes are high for each side.

    Fantasy football rankings for Week 15

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    Saints QB Drew Brees could give his fantasy owners the hammer on Monday night; business as usual with Todd Gurley, Michael Thomas atop their positions.

    APNewsBreak: Champion Red Sox owe nearly $12M in luxury tax

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    APNewsBreak: Champion Red Sox owe nearly $12 million in luxury tax for having baseball's top payroll

    Indians send 1B Alonso to White Sox for outfielder Alex Call

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    Indians' offseason makeover keeps going with trade of 1st baseman Yonder Alonso to White Sox

    Salt Lake City Gets Green Light to Bid for Winter Olympics

    Summary
    Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team’s ascendance into an international powerhouse. The U.S. Olympic Committee said Friday it was selecting Utah’s capital, which stood out as a predictable, slam-dunk pick in a process that also included Denver and Reno, Nevada. With venues still in place — some of them upgraded — from the 2002 Games, Salt Lake claims it can host again at a lower cost than other candidates, which aligns with the International Olympic Committee’s new blueprint for the Games. It’s almost a certain bet the bid will be for 2030, though the USOC left open the possibility of other dates. There are only two bidders for 2026: from Sweden and Italy, after voters in Calgary, Alberta, rejected a proposed bid. USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland said Denver and Salt Lake City both presented strong cases, but that the board determined Utah was the better choice due in part to the existing venues, their proximity to each other, the city’s experience hosting the games and widespread community and political support. She said it minimizes the risk. “It is critical to ensure that we have the ability to create an incredible experience for athletes while at the same time managing sustainability and fiscal responsibility,” Hirshland said. “It was clear to us when we were there and in what they presented that Salt Lake City very much understands the practical realities of hosting a Games, but also wants and supports what they represent.” The city’s selection set off celebration at the mayor’s office where local leaders who worked on the plan gathered. Since 2012, Utah has said it’s ready and willing to host another Olympics. One key hurdle for Salt Lake City will be erasing memories of the bidding scandal that marred the buildup to 2002 and resulted in several IOC members losing their positions for taking bribes. Mitt Romney was brought in to steer the games through the scandal. The newly elected U.S. Senator for Utah told The Associated Press after the announcement that a series of processes put in place by the IOC will ensure no bribery scandal happens again. Romney said Salt Lake City should have a great chance at winning the bid from the IOC because it has shown it can host the games without losing money. Salt Lake City ended up with a surplus after the 2002 Games, money he used to help maintain venues it will use again if it’s awarded the Olympics. “We learned how to produce the Games for the same cost as the revenue that came in,” Romney said. “We will not put a glitzy show like Sochi or Beijing, that are reported to have cost as much $50 billion. We will show the world that you can produce an Olympics without having the government writing the checks.” In many parts of the United States, however, the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City are remembered not for the bribery scandal but for a different reason. After never surpassing 13 medals at a Winter Games, the U.S. used home-turf advantage, an influx of new sports and the emotion of the recent Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks to capture 34 over three weeks in Utah. In the aftermath, Park City and other mountain towns near Salt Lake City preserved and improved upon many of the venues, and continued hosting key international events. The freestyle world championships will be held in Park City in February. Utah organizers say they could host the games for $1.35 billion, some $50 billion less than it cost in Russia for the 2014 Sochi Games, which are the most expensive games ever and stood out as a blaring warning signal that the IOC needed to streamline its bloated Olympic structure. The exorbitant costs have changed the dynamic of Olympic bidding. In 2002, cities were trying to bribe IOC officials to award them the Olympics. These days, the IOC finds itself wanting for bidders. The IOC normally awards Olympics seven years before they’re scheduled, though that calendar has been in flux because so many cities have dropped out. Last year, the IOC handed out the 2024 and 2028 Summer Games at the same time because there were only two cities left in what began as a much bigger contest for 2024. Paris will host 2024, Los Angeles will host 2028, and if Salt Lake wins 2030, it would mark the first time since the IOC began staggering the Games two years apart, in 1994, that the same country has hosted back-to-back. At this time, Salt Lake could be considered a favorite in a 2030 contest that hasn’t really taken shape yet. Hirshland said the USOC has the luxury of time to refine Salt Lake City’s bid. In fact, Salt Lake could still be a favorite for 2026 had it been allowed to go that route. Recently, voters in Calgary rejected that city’s attempt to host, leaving Stockholm and a joint bid from Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy as the only two remaining candidates. A bid from Utah was considered, but putting it in front of the Los Angeles Olympics provided too many hurdles on the marketing side. Rob Cohen, chair of Denver’s Olympic bid committee, called it disappointing that Colorado lost out on the chance to bid but said the process prepared the city as it looks for other chances to showcase the city on the world stage.

    Justice Ginsburg Hails Immigrants as the ‘Vanguard’ to Fight Discrimination in Speech to New Citizens

    Summary
    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg used her first public address since breaking three ribs last month to praise immigrants, saying that they play a “vital part” in cleansing the “stains” of discrimination from the country. Ginsburg spoke at a naturalization ceremony at the National Archives for 31 new citizens hailing from 26 countries on Friday. Her remarks sharply contrasted with the President’s efforts to curtail the number of immigrants entering the United States. Standing before the original copy of the Constitution, Ginsburg acknowledged that many people, including women, people of color and Native Americans, had not always had equal access to their Constitutional rights, but that new immigrants can help to build a better future. “The Constitution sets out the aspiration to form a more perfect union,” Ginsburg said. “While we have made huge progress, the work of perfection is far from done. Many stains remain.” She noted that immigrants have historically been on the “vanguard” of the fight to combat discrimination, including the effort to abolish slavery. Ginsburg also valorized the efforts of immigrants who worked hard to make their way to the country. “We are a nation made strong by people like you: people who travelled long distances, overcame great obstacles and made tremendous sacrifices, all to provide a better life for themselves and their families,” Ginsburg said. She noted that 20 million Americans are naturalized citizens— and that in the United States, “the founders of the U.S. proclaimed that the heart of America would be its citizens, not its rulers.” Ginsburg noted that she is herself the daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, acknowledging the ideal that the United States can be the “land of opportunity” for all citizens. “What is the difference between a bookkeeper in New York City’s garment district and a Supreme Court Justice?” she asked. “One generation—my own life bares witness. The difference between the opportunities available to my mother and those afforded me.” Watch her full remarks below:

    Russia Claims U.S. Unwilling to Hold Talks on Alleged Violations of the INF Treaty

    Summary
    (MOSCOW) — Russia wants to sit down with Pentagon officials for “open and specific” talks on alleged violations of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty, the Russian Defense Ministry said Saturday. The U.S. claims Russia is violating the INF treaty, and on Dec. 4 issued an ultimatum that Moscow come into compliance with the accord in 60 days, or else Washington will withdraw. Russia denies it’s in breach of the treaty. Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu sent his counterpart, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis, a proposal for launching a dialogue three days ago, according to a statement Saturday. But Russia says it hasn’t received any official reply from the Pentagon, which spokesman Maj. Gen. Igor Konashenkov said proves that the U.S. is unwilling to maintain professional dialogue with Moscow on security issues. On Friday, the Russian mission to the U.N. submitted a draft resolution calling for the international community to support the INF treaty against Washington’s threat of withdrawal, warning that a collapse of the treaty could undermine nuclear arms control across the board. Washington began sounding off on a potential Russian violation of the INF treaty under President Barack Obama. Under President Donald Trump, those allegations have been specified and coupled with threats of unilateral withdrawal from the landmark 1987 arms agreement, which banned an entire class of ground-launched missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,000 kilometers (310-3,100 miles). The U.S. claims that a new Russian missile, designated by NATO as the SSC-8, operates in ranges forbidden by the INF treaty. Russia has strongly and routinely denied the claim, at times throwing accusations of non-compliance back at Washington. These claims have, at times, focused on U.S. deployment of anti-missile systems in Romania and Poland. Moscow takes specific issue with the U.S. Mk-41 vertical launching system used by these missile defense installations. The Mk-41, derived from the U.S. Navy’s Aegis missile system, can launch a variety of American missiles — including the sea-launched Tomahawk cruise missile, a weapon that would be banned by INF were it deployed on a ground-based launcher. INF not only bans ground-based intermediate-range missiles, but their launchers too. And Moscow has seized on this point to claim the U.S. is responsible for destabilizing the INF treaty.

    President Trump Says Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Will Leave by End of the Year

    Summary
    (WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump says Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who’s facing federal investigations into his travel, political activity and potential conflicts of interest, will leave the administration at year’s end. Trump tweets that Zinke “accomplished much during his tenure” and that a replacement would be announced next week. The Cabinet post requires Senate confirmation. Zinke, a former Republican congressman from Montana, is leaving weeks before Democrats take control of the House, a shift in power that promised to intensify probes into his conduct. Zinke played a leading part in Trump’s efforts to roll back environmental regulations and promote domestic energy development. His departure comes amid a staff shake-up as Trump heads into his third year in office. The president on Friday named budget director Mick Mulvaney as chief of staff

    Largely Peaceful Protests in Paris as ‘Yellow Vest’ Movement Demonstrates for the Fifth Straight Weekend

    Summary
    (PARIS) — Scuffles broke out between protesters and police in central Paris on Saturday on the sidelines of a largely peaceful demonstration, during the fifth straight weekend of protests by the “yellow vest” movement. Riot police fired small amounts of tear gas to disperse groups of protesters who headed down the side streets off the French capital’s famed Champs-Elysees boulevard, some with traffic still flowing. About 8,000 police and 14 armored vehicles were deployed in Paris for the demonstration, after similar protests in recent weekends turned violent, with protesters smashing and looting stores and setting up burning barricades in the streets. Saturday’s protest was far calmer in the morning, with riot police blocking off groups of protesters who attempted to disperse in side streets. At least 21 people were detained in Paris before the protests began, police said. Some protesters voiced anger at being restricted to a few blocks by police. “We’re surrounded by CRS,” said protester Lionel Toussaint, 53, who works in the heritage industry, referring to riot police. “I’m not armed. I only have Kleenex.” The “yellow vest” movement, which takes its name from the fluorescent safety vests French motorists must all have in their vehicles, emerged in mid-November as a protest against fuel tax increases. It soon morphed into an expression of rage about the high cost of living in France and a sense that President Emanuel Macron’s government is detached from the everyday struggles of workers. Without any clear form or leadership, the movement has attracted a wide range of disgruntled people across the political spectrum, including some violent militants. “Respect my existence or expect my resistance,” read one banner held aloft by protesters who converged on the Champs-Elysees. Pierre Lamy, a 27-year-old industrial worker wearing a yellow vest and with a French flag draped over his shoulders, said the protests had long stopped being about the fuel tax and had turned into a movement for economic justice. “We’re here to represent all our friends and members of our family who can’t come to protest, or because they’re scared,” he said as he walked to the demonstration with three friends. “Everything’s coming up now. We’re being bled dry.” Max Werle, a 56-year-old father of nine, said the protests were his first-ever demonstrations. “I’m here for my children,” he said, adding that his daughter had given birth in a fire truck on Monday because the local hospital in Loiret outside Paris had closed years ago. The office administrator said the protesters were there “to defend our cause. … It’s not a left and right thing.” “Yellow vest” protests were also being held in other parts of France, with no violent incidents reported by mid-day. On Friday, Macron called for calm during the demonstrations, and the French government reiterated the call online for demonstrators to remain peaceful. “Protesting is a right. So let’s know how to exercise it,” the government tweeted from its official account, with a 34-second video which begins with images of historic French protests and recent footage of “yellow vest” protesters rallying peacefully before turning to violence. “Protesting is not smashing. Protesting is not smashing our heritage. Protesting is not smashing our businesses. … Protesting is not smashing our republic,” the video says. Macron acknowledged in a speech earlier this week that he is partially responsible for the anger displayed during the protests, and has announced measures aimed at improving workers’ spending power. He has so far refused to reinstate a wealth tax that was lifted to spur investment in France. But on the streets of Paris, some protesters were saying the president still didn’t understand them. “I think that Macron isn’t in touch with what the yellow vests want. I think the yellow vests need to continue speaking out and the problem is that in the countryside,” said Julie Verrier, a protester from Picardie in Normandy in northern France who had been participating in protests there for the past three weeks and had travelled to Paris for Saturday’s demonstration. “Local city halls are closed so we can’t go there to express and write our complaints and our wishes,” she said. “So coming here is the only way we have to say that French people need to be heard.”

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