Trump says he assumes his 'financial statement' will be released 'at some point'

    Summary
    President Donald Trump assumes his "financial statement" will "at some point" be released, he told ABC News in an interview that aired Sunday.

    Gary Woodland wins 119th US Open

    Summary
    American Gary Woodland has won the 2019 United States Open Championship at Pebble Beach Golf Links in California.

    Internal polling shows Trump lagging in Michigan, Pennsylvania

    Summary
    The Lead panel discusses.

    LA Times executive editor says he helped his college girlfriend get an illegal abortion

    Summary
    Norman Pearlstine, the executive editor of the Los Angeles Times, revealed in a piece for the newspaper on Sunday that a college girlfriend experienced a "botched abortion" before the US Supreme Court legalized the procedure.

    LA Times executive editor says he helped his college girlfriend get an illegal abortion

    Summary
    Norman Pearlstine, the executive editor of the Los Angeles Times, revealed in a piece for the newspaper on Sunday that a college girlfriend experienced a "botched abortion" before the US Supreme Court legalized the procedure.

    Stealing from the sick in Uganda

    Summary
    The BBC has uncovered evidence that prescription drugs have been taken out of circulation by health workers and sold on illegally.

    Germany's far-right AfD party fails to win first mayor

    Summary
    The vote in Görlitz was viewed as a test for the anti-immigration party ahead of regional elections.

    EU leaders face pressure to deliver on climate change

    Summary
    The Greens' election success reshapes the agenda as EU leaders decide the bloc's priorities.

    Saving sharks: One woman's mission to protect the hammerhead

    Summary
    Marine biologist Ilena Zanella vowed to save the shark after diving with them off Costa Rica.

    Letter from Africa: 'Sudan's revolutionaries offline but not silenced'

    Summary
    The internet has been shut down but pro-democracy protesters are finding ways to fight back.

    Trump Heights': Israel renames settlement after Donald Trump

    Summary
    Israel's prime minister has renamed a settlement after his favourite world leader: Donald Trump.

    Deposed Sudanese president seen for first time since uprising

    Summary
    Sudan's ex-president has been seen in public for the first time since he was overthrown by the military.

    Hong Kong leader apologises after mass protests

    Summary
    The Hong Kong chief executive has issued an apology to the public after mass protests against a controversial extradition bill.

    Argentina and Uruguay left without power in massive outage

    Summary
    Argentina and Uruguay have been left without power after a "failure in the electrical interconnection system".

    Netanyahu's wife admits misusing state money for luxury meals

    Summary
    The wife of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has admitted to misusing state funds to pay for luxury restaurant meals, despite employing a full-time chef at home.

    Saudi Youth Sentenced to Prison Instead of Death, Rights Group Says

    Summary
    Murtaja Qureiris, 18, has been held since he was 13. Sentenced to a 12-year term, he was spared execution, a human rights group said.

    Sudan’s Deposed Dictator Makes First Appearance Since Ouster

    Summary
    As officials led President Omar Hassan al-Bashir from prison to face corruption charges, his former protégé was busy consolidating power.

    Your Monday Briefing

    Summary
    Hong Kong protesters keep the pressure on

    Protesters Return to Hong Kong’s Streets, Rejecting Leader’s Apology

    Summary
    Protesters dismissed the apology by Carrie Lam as insincere and called for her resignation among a growing list of demands.

    Candidates for Istanbul Mayor Hold Rare Debate on Live TV

    Summary
    The head-to-head, the first such event in Turkey in 17 years, pitted Ekrem Imamoglu of the opposition against Binali Yildirim, a government-backed former prime minister.

    Guatemala votes for new president, runoff likely to decide outcome

    Summary
    Guatemalans on Sunday voted for a new president, who will face the daunting challenge of curbing drug gang violence that has ravaged the country and helped spur illegal immigration to the United States, stoking tensions with President Donald Trump.

    Yemen's Houthis launch new attack on Saudi Arabia's Abha airport: Al Masirah TV

    Summary
    Yemen's Houthi movement launched a new drone attack targeting the Abha regional airport in southern Saudi Arabia, the group's Al-Masirah TV said on Monday.

    Pressure builds on Hong Kong leader Lam after mass protest

    Summary
    Hong Kong's political crisis enters its second week on Monday as uncertainty mounts over the fate of government leader Carrie Lam and an extradition bill she postponed at the weekend.

    Power mostly restored after massive blackout in Argentina, but questions remain

    Summary
    Power returned to much of Argentina and two neighboring countries following a massive blackout that left tens of millions in the dark on Sunday, but Argentine President Mauricio Macri said the cause of the "unprecedented" outage was still unclear.

    Chinese raids hit North Korean defectors' 'Underground Railroad'

    Summary
    A decade after leaving her family behind to flee North Korea, the defector was overwhelmed with excitement when she spoke to her 22-year-old son on the phone for the first time in May after he too escaped into China.

    Israel renames Golan Heights town in honor of Trump

    Summary
    Israel is hoping the rebranded "Ramat Trump" — Hebrew for "Trump Heights" — will encourage a wave of residents to vastly expand it

    Hong Kong protesters flood the streets demanding city leader's resignation

    Summary
    In Hong Kong, the outrage isn't letting up as some 2 million opponents hit the streets again Sunday demanding the city's leader resign for her support of an extradition bill that would send people to China to face trial and an uncertain future. Ramy Innocencio reports.

    Trump administration plans on building global consensus after oil tanker attack

    Summary
    The Trump administration says the world must unite as it works to build a global consensus that Iran was behind Thursday's attacks on two oil tankers. So far, only Britain and Saudi Arabia are backing the case. Errol Barnett reports.

    Hong Kong makes history as protesters denounce own government

    Summary
    Demonstrators called for the revocation of controversial extradition proposals​, the release of student demonstrators and the resignation of Chief Executive Carrie Lam

    Protesters outside South Florida detention center for kids want it closed

    Summary
    Protesters held signs that read "Homes Instead!" and "Stop Separating Families" as they beat drums and sang civil rights-era protest songs

    Women’s World Cup on TV: Spain and China look to advance

    Summary
    What to watch for in the Women’s World Cup soccer tournament on Monday: GROUP B: CHINA VS. SPAIN Where: Stade Oceane, Le Havre Time: 9 a.m. PDT TV: FS1, Universo The buzz: A win here would send the victor on to the second round while a draw could send both teams through, Spain as the group runner-up...

    West Hollywood’s original marijuana dispensaries fear city will leave them behind

    Summary
    Jason Beck has waited longer than most other California dispensary owners for a chance to sell recreational cannabis. First invited to open Alternative Herbal Health Services by then-West Hollywood Mayor John Duran in 2004, Beck proudly claims to own California’s “longest continuous retail” marijuana...

    Women’s World Cup notes: U.S. felt at home before raucous crowd in Paris

    Summary
    The game was in France. But the crowd? Well, it felt a lot like Kansas City. Parc des Princes, on the edge of Paris, was sold out Sunday for the second time in 10 days for the Women’s World Cup. The first time, the crowd came to see France in the opener. This time, it came to see the Americans. ...

    Earthquake: 3.0 quake strikes near Fontana, Calif.

    Summary
    A shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake was reported Sunday afternoon two miles from Glen Avon, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 5:12 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 1.9 miles. According to the USGS, the epicenter was four miles from Jurupa Valley, four miles...

    Ducks expected to hire Dallas Eakins as their next coach

    Summary
    Dallas Eakins is expected to be announced Monday as the next Ducks coach. Eakins is set to take over for the fired Randy Carlyle, the Los Angeles Times has learned, having coached the team’s minor league affiliate San Diego Gulls for four seasons. This would be his second NHL coaching opportunity...

    Bella Thorne posts topless pics to thwart hacker: 'I took my power back'

    Summary
    Bella Thorne posted topless photos to Twitter Saturday, saying it was to thwart a hacker. Sunday, she said she thinks the alleged hacker is just 17.


    Summary
    Are you a leftie or a rightie?

    Star dads celebrate Father's Day: Chris Evans, Prince Harry, Drake, Sanaa Lathan, more

    Summary
    Gushing and wise, silly and sweet messages, plus great Father's Day photos honor Prince Harry, Steph Curry, Adam Levine, Tom Hanks, Carey Hart, more.

    Gary Woodland holds off defending champ Brooks Koepka to win U.S. Open at Pebble Beach

    Summary
    Gary Woodland won his first major by holding off two-time defending U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka in the final round at Pebble Beach.

    How a stray dog got the best of a Texas police officer (and ate his beef jerky, too)

    Summary
    A stray Texas pit bull 'hijacked' a Kilgore police officer's car Saturday and snagged his beef jerky in the front seat before animal control arrived.

    Alabama to Enforce ‘Chemical Castration’ for Some Child Molesters

    Summary
    (MONTGOMERY, Ala.) — Some Alabama sex offenders who abuse young children will have to undergo “chemical castration” while on parole, under a new law, but the requirement has prompted legal concerns and appears to be rarely used in some states that allow it. The procedure uses medications that block testosterone production in order to decrease sex drive. The Alabama law says sex offenders whose crimes involved children between ages 7 and 13 must receive the medication before being released from prison on parole. Alabama doesn’t allow parole for sex crimes involving children 6 and under. After Gov. Kay Ivey’s office announced Monday she had signed the bill, some legal groups raised questions. Randall Marshall, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Alabama, said there are constitutional concerns with forced medication. Dillon Nettles, a policy analyst with the ACLU of Alabama, said the law harkens back to a “dark time” in history. “It presents serious issues, involving involuntary medical treatment, informed consent, privacy and cruel and unusual punishment,” Nettles said. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Rep. Steve Hurst of Munford, scoffs at that kind of talk. “How in the world can it be any more cruel and inhumane than to molest a child? I want someone to answer that one for me, but they can’t,” Hurst said. Hurst said he hopes the medication will protect children by stopping abusers from reoffending. At least seven states have laws authorizing chemical castration in some form. But its effectiveness can vary. The hormonal treatment can be useful for a subgroup of offenders whose crimes are driven by sexual attraction to children and want to reduce those urges, said Dr. Frederick Berlin, who treats patients with sexual disorders at Johns Hopkins Hospital and at an independent clinic. However, he has concerns about a blanket criminal justice approach without evaluating the appropriateness in each case. “Speaking now as a physician, I think it’s absolutely inappropriate to use a medical treatment as a criminal sanction,” Berlin said. He said it’s not effective for people whose crimes were driven by drugs, mental illness or other issues. “These laws tend to go on the books because people understandably are frightened. They want to protect children which I hope every reasonable person wants to do,” Berlin said. “At its worst, I think the motivation, if we are just going to say it crudely: ‘We are just going to castrate the bastard.’ Or at its best it’s a misunderstanding, and lack of understanding when it would and when it wouldn’t be medically appropriate.” The stereotypical child molester is male, but a fraction of sex offenders are women. Berlin said the situation is more complicated for women because of hormonal balance involved in the menstrual cycle and maintaining pregnancy, but treatment with a drug like Depo-Provera has been used to help some women gain better sexual self-control. California was the first state to pass such a law in 1996. Ike Dodson, a spokesman with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said it’s is rarely used there. Two parolees are currently receiving treatment. Dodson said one of them is mandated to receive it under law, and the other requested it voluntarily. Prison officials in Montana and Louisiana told The Associated Press last year that they’re aware of only one case in each state in the last decade in which a judge ordered the treatment. Texas even allows repeat sex offenders to opt for surgical castration. Texas and Florida did not have numbers immediately available on use. Georgia had a chemical castration statute but repealed it. Oregon also had a pilot program chemical castration but it was repealed. The Alabama law says a judge shall order the treatment as a condition of release and will require parolees to receive an initial dose of medication before leaving prison, and to receive additional doses after leaving. A judge would decide when they could stop. They would be billed for the medication, although fees could be waived for those who couldn’t afford it. The law also says an Alabama Health Department employee must administer the medication after an inmate’s release from prison. Lawmakers say it’s constitutional because it only applies when an inmate seeks release on parole. Inmates who opt to serve their entire sentence would not have to take the medication. “I think it’s constitutional because it’s not mandatory,” Alabama Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Cam Ward said. He also said it would apply to a small group of sex offenders. Hurst began pushing the legislation more than a decade ago after hearing the story of an infant who was sexually abused. He originally proposed permanent surgical castration, but he was told by the state’s then-attorney general that would be found unconstitutional. The proposal went nowhere in the Statehouse for more than a decade before it won final passage this year on a quick vote in the Senate. Hurst said it may have prevailed because people didn’t notice it. Hurst said he’s open to improvements in the law, and would like to see a university involved in a future study on effectiveness. But for him, it comes down to simple justice. “If they are going to mark those children for life, they need to be marked for life. … My real feelings are that they need to die,” Hurst said. The law takes effect later this year.

    Men in Black and Shaft Drag Weekend Box Office Down 50% From Last Year as Franchise Fatigue Sets in

    Summary
    (LOS ANGELES) — Brand familiarity isn’t everything when it comes to attracting audiences to the multiplex, and Hollywood is learning that lesson the hard way this summer with a slew of underperforming sequels and reboots. That so-called franchise fatigue came to a head this weekend with the releases of “Men in Black: International” and “Shaft.” The writing may have been on the wall after neither an X-Men movie (“Dark Phoenix”) nor a Godzilla movie (“Godzilla: King of the Monsters”) could get moviegoers enthusiastic enough to turn out. But this weekend, down over 50% from last year, is the worst yet. “This was a rough weekend,” said Comscore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian. “We’ve had some big franchises that are not resonating with audiences or critics.” And there’s a common denominator between all the recent disappointments: Poor reviews. All four have been certified “rotten” on Rotten Tomatoes. “Men in Black: International” took the No. 1 spot in North America, but it’s a dubious distinction for the Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth-led reboot which isn’t exactly the franchise-revitalizer it hoped to be. Sony Pictures on Sunday estimates the F. Gary Gray-directed film earned only $28.5 million over the weekend against a reported $110 million production budget. The three previous “Men in Black” films all opened to over $50 million not accounting for inflation. However, international audiences are helping the bottom line with the film earning $73.7 million from 36 markets, bringing its global total to $102.2 million. The weekend’s other big new release, “Shaft,” which introduces another generation to the franchise, couldn’t even manage to carve out a place in the top five, which instead was populated mostly by holdovers. “The Secret Life of Pets 2” got the No. 2 spot in its second weekend with $23.8 million. Disney’s “Aladdin,” now in weekend four, took third with $16.7 million. “Dark Phoenix” placed fourth with $9 million and “Rocketman” coasted to fifth with $8.8 million. “Shaft,” a Warner Bros. release, placed sixth on the charts, with a disappointing $8.3 million. Directed by Tim Story, “Shaft” features Samuel L. Jackson reprising his role from almost 20 years ago and Jessie T. Usher as his son. It was made for around $30 million. Although critics did not praise the film, audiences who turned out (54% of whom were women) were more enthusiastic, giving the film an A CinemaScore. Even some originals had a tough time this weekend. Amazon Studios expanded its Mindy Kaling and Emma Thompson comedy “Late Night,” which it acquired the North American rights to for a Sundance record of $13 million, to 2,220 theaters where it earned $5.1 million. “The real bright spots have been the smaller indies,” Dergarabedian said. “We think of summer as blockbuster season, but it’s turned into indie film season.” Jim Jarmusch’s star-studded zombie comedy “The Dead Don’t Die” mostly survived its mixed reviews and opened to $2.35 million from 613 locations. Documentaries like “Echo in the Canyon” and “Pavarotti” have been making a modest mark in limited release, and the acclaimed drama “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” expanded to 36 locations and earned $361,120. It expands further next weekend. But the marketplace is hurting and it’s not a problem with the weekend, which last year saw “Incredibles 2” open to over $182 million, but with the major movies themselves. The disappointments have come, mostly, from “movies that just don’t deliver,” according to Dergarabedian. But it’s too simplistic to fault all franchises and next weekend the marketplace will be singing a different tune when “Toy Story 4” opens. “‘Toy Story 4’ is going to erase the memory of this very tough weekend,” Dergarabedian said. Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday. 1. “Men in Black: International,” $28.5 million ($73.7 million international). 2. “The Secret Life of Pets 2,” $23.8 million ($8.5 million international). 3. “Aladdin,” $16.7 million ($47.5 million international). 4. “Dark Phoenix,” $9 million ($24.2 million international). 5. “Rocketman,” $8.8 million ($8.5 million international). 6. “Shaft,” $8.3 million. 7. “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” $8.1 million ($14.1 million international). 8. “John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum,” $6.1 million ($6.2 million international). 9. “Late Night,” $5.1 million ($255,000 international). 10. “Ma,” $3.6 million ($2.3 million international). ___ Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to Comscore: 1. “Men in Black: International,” $73.7 million. 2. “Aladdin,” $47.5 million. 3. “Dark Phoenix,” $24.2 million. 4. “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” $14.1 million. 5. “My Best Summer (Zui Hao De Wo Men),” $8.7 million. 6. “The Secret Life of Pets 2” and “Rocketman,” $8.5 million. 7. “Parasite,” $7.8 million. 8. “John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum,” $6.2 million. 9. “A City Called Macau,” $4.1 million. 10. “Chasing the Dragon 2: Wild Wild Bunch,” $3.4 million.

    Secretary of State Pompeo Wants to ‘Unite’ the World Over Alleged Iran Attacks

    Summary
    (WASHINGTON) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is reaching out to wary foreign leaders to frame alleged Iranian attacks in a Middle East oil shipping route as a problem for the world at large, especially for Asian countries vitally dependent on that oil. Pompeo, in a series of Sunday television interviews, emphasized the U.S. international outreach in the wake of what the U.S. says were Iranian attacks Thursday on two oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz. “I made a bunch of phone calls yesterday. I’ll make a whole bunch more calls today. The world needs to unite,” Pompeo said. He did not say what kind of action the Trump administration envisioned. “We are going to work to build out a set of countries that have deep vested interest in keeping that strait open to help us do that,” Pompeo said. That echoed comments from acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan this past week when he said the U.S. goal is to “build international consensus to this international problem.” Iran has denied being involved in the attacks and accused America of promoting an “Iranophobic” campaign against it. Pressed on whether any new U.S. military deployment to the region was possible, Pompeo said that “of course” remained among the options that President Donald Trump may consider to keep shipping safe through the narrow strait, a strategic choke point for oil shipments from the Middle East. Trump last year withdrew the U.S. from an international agreement, signed in 2015 by President Barack Obama, to limit Iran’s nuclear program. Trump has reinstated economic sanctions and recently ended waivers that allowed some countries to continue buying Iranian oil. That has deprived Iran of oil income and has coincided with what U.S. officials said was a surge in intelligence pointing to Iranian preparations for attacks against U.S. forces and interests in the Gulf region. The U.S. has accelerated the deployment of the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier battle group to the region, sent four nuclear-capable B-52 bombers to Qatar and bolstered its defenses in the region by deploying more Patriot air defense systems. Some European allies have called for a careful investigation of responsibility, worried that Trump was escalating tensions with a country he has long called a top U.S. enemy. Pompeo stressed that the U.S. gets relatively little of its energy supplies through the strait, which lies between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says 16 percent of U.S. petroleum imports came from the Persian Gulf countries in 2018. By contrast, about 80% of oil through the shipping passage supplies energy-hungry countries in Asia, including China, Japan, India and South Korea. Those countries have skin in the game, he said. “I’m confident that when they see the risk — the risk of their own economies and their own people and outrageous behavior of the Islamic Republic of Iran, they will join us in this,” Pompeo said. Pompeo said intelligence officials had “lots of data, lots of evidence” that Iran was responsible. Pressed for specifics, Pompeo pointed to grainy black-and-white footage already released by the U.S. American officials say the footage shows Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops removing an unexploded mine from a Japanese tanker. The tanker’s crew gave an apparently different account, saying “flying objects” targeted the vessel. Pompeo said the administration had shared the video and other unspecified evidence with Germany and other nations. Asked if the U.S. had a credibility problem with allies worried Trump could be seeking a pretext to move against Iran, the secretary of state said, “We’re not selling anything. These- these are simple facts.” Pompeo spoke on “Fox News Sunday” and CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

    O.J. Simpson Has Joined Twitter: ‘I Got a Little Getting Even to Do’

    Summary
    O.J. Simpson, former football star and defendant in one of America’s most notorious murder trials, is on Twitter. Though the @TheRealOJ32 Twitter account is as yet unverified, it has posted two videos featuring Simpson promising to provide commentary on sports and politics, as well as to “set the record straight.” “It should be a lot of fun,” Simpson, 71, said in his first video post, which has been viewed over 9 million times so far. “I got a little getting even to do.” Coming Soon!!! pic.twitter.com/R1tXOuuLgO — O.J. Simpson (@TheRealOJ32) June 15, 2019 Simpson was released from prison in October 2017, after serving nine years on a Las Vegas robbery and kidnapping conviction. Continuing to live in Las Vegas, he recently described the current state of his life as a “no negative zone” in a recent phone interview with the Associated Press. Simpson became the center of a national controversy in 1994, after his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman were murdered. Simpson was acquitted by a jury in 1995, after a polarizing trial that transfixed the country. He was later ordered to pay $33.5 million for the wrongful deaths of Goldman and his ex-wife after a civil suit was brought against him by the victims’ families. In October 2008, Simpson was convicted on charges of robbery and kidnapping in connection with a 2007 confrontation at a Las Vegas hotel room. “Coming soon to Twitter, you’ll get to read all my thoughts and opinions on just about everything,” Simpson said in his first video, uploaded on Friday. He followed up with a video Saturday, wishing viewers a happy Father’s Day. Since launching the account, Simpson has so far racked up more than half a million followers on the social media account.

    Boeing CEO Concedes ‘Mistake’ Made With 737 Max Jets

    Summary
    (PARIS) — The chief executive of Boeing said the company made a “mistake” in handling a problematic cockpit warning system in its 737 Max jets before two crashes of the top-selling plane killed 346 people, and he promised transparency as the U.S. aircraft maker tries to get the grounded model back in flight. Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg told reporters in Paris that Boeing’s communication with regulators, customers and the public “was not consistent. And that’s unacceptable.” The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has faulted Boeing for not telling regulators for more than year that a safety indicator in the Max cockpit didn’t work. Pilots are angry the company didn’t tell them about the new software that’s been implicated in the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. “We clearly had a mistake in the implementation of the alert,” Muilenburg said. He expressed confidence that the Boeing 737 Max would be cleared to fly again later this year. The model has been grounded worldwide for three months, and regulators need to approve Boeing’s long-awaited fix to the software. Muilenburg called the crashes of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines jets a “defining moment” for Boeing, but said he thinks the result will be a “better and stronger company.” Speaking ahead of the Paris Air Show, Muilenburg said Boeing is facing the event with “humility” and focused on rebuilding trust. He forecast a limited number of orders at the Paris show, the first major air show since the crashes, but said it was important to attend to talk to customers and others in the industry. Muilenburg also announced that Boeing is raising its long-term forecast for global plane demand, notably amid sustained growth in Asia.

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