Watch Pence discuss details of ceasefire

    Summary
    Vice President Mike Pence says Turkey and the US have agreed to a 120-hour ceasefire so Kurdish forces may evacuate northern Syria.

    NASA telescope captures historic image

    Summary
    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured the first ever video of a confirmed interstellar comet.

    Pence said operation would end when Kurdish forces complete withdrawal

    Summary
    US Vice President Mike Pence announced Thursday that he and President Erdogan of Turkey agreed to a ceasefire halting Turkey's incursion into northern Syria.

    Acosta: This has become the catch us if you can administration

    Summary
    President Trump's acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney says that aid to Ukraine was in fact tied to President Trump's wish for an investigation into the 2016 election.

    Paul Rudd pulls double duty in 'Living With Yourself'

    Summary
    Paul Rudd does double duty in "Living With Yourself," a bizarrely twisty, highly inventive dark comedy that, among other things, considers the elusive quest for happiness. The premise, frankly, really doesn't do this Netflix series justice, as the producers somehow keep pulling rabbits -- and unexpected wrinkles -- out of hats.

    Turkey to suspend Syria offensive, Mike Pence announces

    Summary
    US Vice-President Mike Pence says the pause in operations will allow Kurdish-led forces to withdraw.

    Venezuela wins seat on UN Human Rights Council

    Summary
    The same body announced plans to send a fact-finding mission to investigate Venezuela last month.

    Russians accused of extremism cut wrists in court

    Summary
    The pair are accused of belonging to a group that were attempting to overthrow President Putin.

    National Doral Miami: Trump Florida golf course to host G7 summit

    Summary
    The Doral Miami resort will host the summit but the president will not profit, the White House says.

    Iwo Jima photo: US soldier misidentified in iconic picture

    Summary
    The true identity of one of the troops shown planting the US flag in a famous WW2 photo is revealed.

    Turkey agrees 'ceasefire' in Syria offensive to allow Kurds out

    Summary
    Turkey and the US have reached a deal to suspend the incursion into northern Syria, to allow Kurdish fighters to withdraw.

    Former Nazi, 93, on trial over 5,000 concentration camp deaths

    Summary
    A former Nazi guard has gone on trial over the deaths of more than 5,000 prisoners at a World War Two concentration camp in Poland.

    Will and Kate's turbulent flight aborts landings in thunderstorm

    Summary
    Prince William has said he and wife Kate are fine after their turbulent flight's landing in Islamabad was aborted twice.

    Assad will 'respond to Turkish aggression' on any part of Syria

    Summary
    Syria's president says he will respond to Turkish aggression on any part of the country, state media reports.

    HK politicians dragged out of parliament after activist attacked

    Summary
    Pro-democracy politicians in Hong Kong were dragged out of parliament for heckling leader Carrie Lam as they demanded an inquiry into a vicious attack on a prominent human rights activist.

    Your Thursday Briefing

    Summary
    Brexit, Syria, President Trump: Here’s what you need to know.

    Trump Officials Press for a Cease-Fire After Turkish Incursion in Syria

    Summary
    A letter by President Trump last week, warning Mr. Erdogan in blunt terms against the incursion, threatened to make the shuttle diplomacy by Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo more difficult.

    Civilian Casualties Reach Highest Level in Afghan War, U.N. Says

    Summary
    July was the deadliest month for noncombatants in Afghanistan since the organization began tracking such figures a decade ago.

    Elijah Cummings, Brexit, Chicago: Your Thursday Briefing

    Summary
    Here's what you need to know.

    Wheels Up on More Flights to the African Continent

    Summary
    New nonstop flights are dramatically cutting travel time and linking more African cities to the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

    Malaysia working to clear hundreds of plastic waste shipments at ports: officials

    Summary
    Malaysia is negotiating with countries sending their plastic waste to the Southeast Asian nation to take back the trash and is waiving storage fees to clear hundreds of containers of scrap stranded at ports across the country for months, officials say.

    UK lawmaker Grieve will oppose Brexit deal unless put to referendum

    Summary
    Dominic Grieve, one of 21 lawmakers ousted from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservative Party last month, will oppose Johnson's Brexit deal in a parliamentary vote on Saturday unless it is subsequently put to a referendum.

    Turkey's operation in northern Syria splits Germany's migrant communities

    Summary
    Turkey's military offensive in neighboring Syria is raising tensions among Germany's large Turkish, Kurdish and Syrian Arab communities, who are bitterly divided over the operation and have made conflicting demands of Berlin on how to respond.

    Pakistan expects to avert blacklisting over terrorism financing

    Summary
    Backed by longtime ally China, Pakistan is confident it will avert blacklisting over terrorism financing by a global watchdog on Friday but it will not be completely off the hook until it proves it is genuinely severing ties with Islamist militants, officials and analysts said.

    Observatory: 224 SDF soldiers, 183 Turkish-backed rebels killed in Syria clashes

    Summary
    A Turkish offensive into northeast Syria has led to the death of 224 from the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) and 183 Turkish-backed rebels after the first eight days of fighting, the Syrian Observatory reported on Thursday.

    Pence and Pompeo in Turkey to seek ceasefire between Turks and Kurds

    Summary
    Reporters were prohibited from asking questions, per an agreement the U.S. made with the Turks

    Syria fallout "essentially irreversible," retired admiral says

    Summary
    Sandy Winnefeld said about territory being left by U.S. troops: "That ground is gone now. We handed it over for free."

    Read the U.S. ambassador to the E.U.'s testimony to Congress

    Summary
    "Please know that I would not have recommended that Mr. Giuliani or any private citizen be involved in these foreign policy matters"

    2 Americans arrested in China could be held for "months or years"

    Summary
    China said Thursday it detained two U.S. citizens on suspicion of organizing others to illegally cross the border

    Fallout from Trump's change in Syria policy "essentially irreversible," retired admiral says

    Summary
    The Trump administration is making its strongest push yet for a ceasefire in northern Syria. Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with the Turkish president in Ankara. They’re trying to convince Turkey to halt its military operation against the Kurds. Retired Adm. Sandy Winnefeld, former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and CBS News military and homeland security analyst, joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the situation.

    Earthquake: 3.6 quake hits near Soledad, Calif.

    Summary
    The quake was reported at 7:54 a.m. It occurred 14 miles from Hollister, 18 miles from Salinas, 20 miles from Greenfield and 20 miles from Prunedale.

    California's earthquake warning app: How much time would you get to prepare?

    Summary
    With the new MyShake app, how many seconds would you get from an earthquake early warning?

    Ed Buck was known for his abrasive behavior. But politicians still took his money

    Summary
    For years, Ed Buck was said to intimidate and harass his political foes in West Hollywood, but that didn't stop politicians from taking his money.

    Full coverage: Democratic donor Ed Buck faces criminal charges

    Summary
    Read our full coverage of the investigation into Democratic donor Ed Buck and the fatal overdoses in his West Hollywood home.

    Newsletter: What a Bay Area baby rave tells us about the pressures of millennial parenting

    Summary
    My colleague Sonja Sharp just published a wonderful dispatch from Oakland about the rise of the Bay Area's hottest dance party: a wildly popular daytime "rave" for children under four.

    Mick Mulvaney acknowledges Ukraine aid was withheld over investigation into Democrats

    Summary
    Donald Trump's acting chief of staff said Thursday that aid to Ukraine was withheld because of the president's desire for Kiev to probe U.S. politics.

    All roads lead to Putin,' Pelosi said she told Trump as photo of meeting was snapped

    Summary
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said a photo of her appearing to upbraid President Donald Trump was taken as she told Trump his recent actions help Russia.

    White House: Next G-7 meeting will take place at Trump's Doral facility in Florida

    Summary
    President Donald Trump will host world leaders at a G-7 economic summit next year at his Doral golf resort in Miami, the White House announced Thursday.

    Bob Kingsley, celebrated country radio host, dies at age 80

    Summary
    Iconic country radio figure Bob Kingsley began hosting "American Country Countdown" in 1978. He died in Texas Thursday.

    A passionate guy': Ex-NASCAR team owner found dead in Ohio River near Louisville

    Summary
    Lonnie Troxell, of a racing team from 2000-2005 that competed in the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series, was found floating in the Ohio River Tuesday.

    Homeowner Who Found His Basement Flooded With Five Inches of Blood Is Having a Rough Week

    Summary
    It sounds like a scene straight from a Hollywood horror film, but when an Iowa homeowner found his basement filled with blood, it was all too real. Nick Lestina headed down to the basement of his house in Bagley, Iowa, only to be greeted with a nightmare scenario of nearly five inches of blood, fat, and bones covering the floor. It wasn’t an Iowa-based reboot of *Amityville Horror* or an attempt to recreate the blood tide from *The Shining* or even a Halloween prank gone wrong. After Lestina surveyed the horrifying scene, he realized that it all had to do with choosing the wrong neighbor. Lestina didn’t live next door to a serial killer, dispatching his victims in some gruesome manner, but a meat locker draining its bloody leftovers. According to *The Des Moines Register*, Lestina and his family of seven had peacefully lived next to a business called Dahl’s Custom Meat Locker for ten years. They had never had any problems until the literal blood bath that filled Lestina’s basement, which he believes was the result of his neighbors dumping the remains of pigs and cows down a floor drain which is connected to his pipes. KTIV News Four shared a photo of the bloody mess on social media: Blood fills Iowa family’s basementhttps://t.co/D0XR4toB5B pic.twitter.com/8fzTD46oDi — KTIV News Four (@ktivnews) October 16, 2019 After discovering the gore-filled horror show, some may have called a priest or opened a Halloween haunted house, but instead Lestina immediately reported it to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. They, in turn, called the Iowa Department of Health because blood and bones can be hazardous, especially with children in the house. Turns out that the meat locker’s drainage system had backed up during a slaughter, which caused the blood and gore to pour into the home’s basement. Two weeks later, the blood is still seeping into the basement and the family has had to leave their home. Lestina is working with officials, his insurance company, as well as the meat locker and its insurance company to clean up the horrifying scene. Dahl’s Custom Meat Locker did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment, but co-owner Kaitlin Dahl told *WHO-TV*, “We’re taking responsibility for it. It wasn’t our fault, we didn’t intentionally put the blood down there. We didn’t want this to happen. We feel for them. I’d be just as mad as they are, in their shoes.” The company also told *The Des Moines Register* that they always planned to help cover the family’s cleanup costs. If there is a lesson to be learned, it’s this: don’t build your house on an old cemetery and don’t live next door to a meat locker.

    E.U. Leaders Endorse Brexit Deal, Sending It to U.K. Parliament for Ratification

    Summary
    (BRUSSELS) –– European leaders have unanimously endorsed the Brexit deal, formally sending it to the British Parliament for ratification. The European Council president’s office announced in a tweet that the leaders had endorsed a statement on Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. The leaders invited the EU’s institutions take steps to ensure the agreement can start on Nov. 1, but emphasized that they wanted “as close as possible a partnership with the United Kingdom in the future.” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has pledged to take the country out of the EU on Oct. 31 and said Thursday’s agreement means no new delay is necessary. He still needs parliament to agree, though, and a previous deal was rejected three times. His political rivals and some crucial allies have said they won’t back this latest agreement, putting its future in doubt.

    Mike Pence Meets With Turkish President Erdogan Seeking Syria Border Cease-Fire

    Summary
    (ANKARA, Turkey) — A senior U.S. delegation led by Vice President Mike Pence pursued an uphill mission Thursday to persuade Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to call for a cease-fire in his fight with Kurdish forces in northern Syria. Pence and Erdogan wore dour expressions as they shook hands before a nearly 90-minute one-on-one meeting, and during an expanded bilateral meeting with the full delegations Thursday afternoon. After hours of meetings it was not immediately clear if there was any movement toward a cease-fire. Armored SUVs carrying Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien entered the vast Turkish presidency complex in Ankara for the meetings. The U.S. officials were expected to warn Erdogan that he will face additional economic sanctions if he doesn’t halt his assault on Kurdish forces once allied with the U.S. in the fight against the Islamic State group. President Donald Trump earlier spoke dismissively of the same crisis he sent his aides on an emergency mission to douse. The U.S. delegation’s visit came hours after Trump declared the U.S. has no stake in defending Kurdish fighters who died by the thousands as America’s partners against Islamic State extremists. Trump suggested Wednesday that Kurdish fighters might be a greater terror threat than the Islamic State group, and he welcomed the efforts of Russia and the Assad government to fill the void left after he ordered the removal of nearly all U.S. troops from Syria amid a Turkish assault on the Kurds. “Syria may have some help with Russia, and that’s fine,” Trump said. “They’ve got a lot of sand over there. So, there’s a lot of sand that they can play with.” He added: “Let them fight their own wars.” The split-screen foreign policy moment proved difficult to reconcile and came during perhaps the darkest moment for the modern U.S.-Turkey relationship and a time of trial for Trump and his Republican Party allies. Severe condemnation of Trump’s failure to deter Erdogan’s assault on the Kurds, and his subsequent embrace of Turkish talking points about the former U.S. allies, sparked bipartisan outrage in the U.S. and calls for swift punishment for the NATO ally. Republicans and Democrats in the House, bitterly divided over the Trump impeachment inquiry, banded together Wednesday for an overwhelming 354-60 denunciation of the U.S. troop withdrawal. Many lawmakers expressed worry that the withdrawal may lead to revival of the Islamic State group as well as Russian presence and influence in the area, besides the slaughter of many Kurds. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., publicly broke with Trump to call the U.S. relationship with the Kurds “a great alliance.” “I’m sorry that we are where we are. I hope the vice president and the secretary of state can somehow repair the damage,” McConnell said Wednesday. Even among top administration officials, there were concerns that the trip lacked achievable goals and had been undermined by Trump before it began. Planning for the trip first began late Monday after the two presidents spoke by phone, and details were still being sorted as the vice president landed in Turkey. While Erdogan faces global condemnation for the invasion, he also sees renewed nationalistic fervor at home, and any pathway to de-escalation likely would need to delicately avoid embarrassing Erdogan domestically. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal thinking. The White House disclosed that Trump had both cajoled and threatened Erdogan in an unusual letter last week, urging him to act only in “the right and humane way” in Syria. The letter was sent the day Erdogan launched the major offensive against the Kurds. Trump started it on a positive note by suggesting the two of them “work out a good deal,” but then talked about crippling economic sanctions and concluded that the world “will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don’t happen. Don’t be a tough guy. Don’t be a fool!” Trump did place some sanctions on Turkey for the offensive. But he appeared to undercut his delegation’s negotiating stance, saying the U.S. has no business in the region — and not to worry about the Kurdish fighters. “If Turkey goes onto Syria, that’s between Turkey and Syria, it’s not between Turkey and the United States,” Trump said during an Oval Office meeting with Italian President Sergio Mattarella. As he sought to persuade Erdogan to agree to a cease-fire, Pence also confronted doubts about American credibility and his own, as an emissary of an inconsistent president. “Given how erratic President Trump’s decision-making process and style has been, it’s just hard to imagine any country on the receiving end of another interlocutor really being confident that what Pence and Pompeo are delivering reflects Trump’s thinking at the moment or what it will be in the future,” said Jeffrey Prescott, the Obama administration’s senior director for Iran, Iraq, Syria and the Gulf states on the National Security Council. He is also a former deputy national security adviser to former Vice President Joe Biden. The U.S. withdrawal is the worst decision of Trump’s presidency, said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who meets often with the president and is one of his strongest and most important supporters in Congress. “To those who think the Mideast doesn’t matter to America, remember 9/11 — we had that same attitude on 9/10/2001,” Graham said Even before Trump’s comments, Erdogan had stated on Wednesday that he would be undeterred by the sanctions. He said the fighting would end only if Kurdish fighters abandoned their weapons and retreated from positions near the Turkish border. If Pence can persuade Turkey to agree to a cease-fire, which few U.S. officials believed was likely, experts warn it will not erase the signal Trump’s action sent to American allies across the globe or the opening already being exploited by Russia in the region. Turkish troops and Turkish-backed Syrian fighters launched their offensive against Kurdish forces in northern Syria a week ago, two days after Trump suddenly announced he was withdrawing the U.S. from the area. Ankara has long argued the Kurdish fighters are nothing more than an extension of the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, which has waged a guerrilla campaign inside Turkey since the 1980s and which Turkey, as well as the U.S. and European Union, designate as a terrorist organization.

    More Than 75 Million Americans Are Currently in a Drought — and It’s Getting Worse

    Summary
    (BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) — A drought affecting more than 30 million people across the Southeastern United States is getting worse. The latest assessment from the U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday shows arid conditions are deepening from Alabama to Virginia. Areas that were experiencing a moderate drought are now in a severe or extreme drought despite occasional rain. About 75 million people nationally are living in drought areas nationally, with the largest share in the Southeast. Forecasters say farm fields are drying out and some streams are down to a trickle. Alabama is under a wildfire alert after about 530 fires burned more than 6,200 acres (more than 2,500 hectares) of land over the last months. The weather service says a disturbance moving through the Gulf of Mexico could bring additional rain to the region.

    Editor-in-Chief Edward Felsenthal Opens The First TIME 100 Health Summit

    Summary
    TIME Editor-in-Chief Edward Felsenthal welcomed leaders from across the health-care community to the magazine’s first TIME 100 Health Summit. The TIME 100 Summit will feature current and former leaders from various fields — including former President Bill Clinton, former Vice President Al Gore, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, and former Planned Parenthood President Dr. Leana Wen — Thursday in New York City. Felsenthal, in his opening remarks, told the assembled audience of scientists, physicians, activists and business leaders that the spirit of the summit is to invite leaders from various fields to work together to address of the most significant health challenges facing the world. “There’s a reason why Health is central to what we do at TIME,” Felsenthal said. “We are living through epic global events, with a news cycle moving at warp speed, yet there is no topic more personal or more important to our audiences than their health and the health of their families. There has never been more health information available to patients, yet at the same time so much confusion about what information can be trusted. There has also never been more innovation in both wellness and treatment. And yet unequal access remains one of the blights of our age.” He noted that TIME has reported that your zip code may be one of the most significant influences on an individual lifespan. For instance, the projected lifespan of a New Yorker may vary by decades depending on which neighborhood they live in, according to NYU data. Felsenthal also invited Summit attendees to help produce the cover of next week’s issue of TIME, which he said will be “a special edition focused on what we as a society need to do to seize this incredible moment of possibility in health care.” He displayed several of the options, including a cover that would feature an article with the tag line “There’s Never Been a Better Time to Be Sick…. So Long as You’re Rich.” Read the full remarks below: We have an amazing program ahead of us today. With us here, not only on this stage but throughout the room, are hundreds of extraordinarily accomplished people from all over the health care community. You are physicians and policy makers, activists, innovators, scientists and CEOs. You are people with the power and the platforms to create lasting change. You know, there’s a reason why Health is central to what we do at TIME. We’re living through epic global events, with a news cycle at warp speed, yet there is no topic more personal or more important to our audiences than their health and the health of their families. There has never been more health information available to patients, yet at the same time so much confusion about what information can be trusted. There’s also never been more innovation in both wellness and treatment. And yet, unequal access remains one of the blight- one the blights of our age. What, for example, is the biggest single factor in determining how long each of us will live? It may be your zip code, as my colleagues at TIME reported earlier this year. Here in New York, according to NYU data, average lifespans are almost 20 years longer for people living on the Upper East Side than their neighbors in nearby East Harlem. Those challenges—and opportunities—are what bring us together today. They are also what our growing TIME 100 community is all about, convening the world’s most influential people across every field toward collaboration, action and progress. In that spirit of collaboration, we’re going to do something today that we’ve never done before, which is invite all of you to help us produce next week’s issue of TIME, a special edition focused on what we as a society need to do to seize this incredible moment of possibility in health care. To get the thinking going, our Creative Director, DW Pine, who is I think- wave DW – over there- DW has mocked up a few covers. This is what we do every week at TIME, although usually with a smaller group! We’re going to talk about, today about medical advances like CRISPR gene editing and unlocking the microbiome with – Do we have the covers? – Good. With some of the great innovators of our time like Dr. Carl June, the immunologist is here, geneticist Dr. Eric Lander, surgeon Dr. Laura Esserman—all of them past Time 100 honorees. We’ll talk about how AI and machine learning and how they’re beginning to transform cancer treatment and elder care. This is the cover on that subject. And we have an extraordinary group of policy leaders to discuss the public health challenges we face, from the dire consequences of climate change for public health to vast inequalities in access to care. We are honored to have Vice President Al Gore with us today; he’ll be here on stage momentarily. The 42nd President of the United States, Bill Clinton, will be joining us this afternoon. And from the Trump Administration, we have the three most powerful officials in the federal health care system with us: Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar, Director of the Center[s] for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma and the director of the NIH for the past decade, Dr. Francis Collins. He oversees a $39 billion budget that funds some of the world’s great research institutions. Throughout the day I hope each of us get a chance to think about what we can all contribute toward a better, healthier world. And I encourage you to come find me or our Summit co-chairs Alice Park and Dr. David Agus—you’ll meet them shortly– to share your own ideas about these opportunities and challenges and your own thoughts about what we at TIME should highlight in next week’s issue for our readers around the world. You can also email us any time today or in the coming days at health@time.com Finally, I want to thank some special people for helping to make the inaugural TIME 100 Health Summit a reality: our partners the Alzheimer’s Association, The Rockefeller Foundation, Khosla Ventures, and Smartsheet; our wonderful owners and co-chairs Marc and Lynne Benioff, who have given all of us at TIME the extraordinary opportunity to write a new chapter in our own story; and to all of you in the audience as well viewers around the world who are joining our community via livestream on Time.com. Thank you! And now it is my privilege to introduce a very special performance from a show that has done so much to elevate the conversation around mental health. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the star of Broadway’s Tony Award winning hit musical Dear Evan Hansen, Andrew Barth Feldman.

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