UFC fighter was charged with battery from an April incident. He didn't know until July

    Summary
    MMA fighter Jon "Bones" Jones has been charged with battery, according to a criminal summons filed in Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court in New Mexico.

    No human remains found in new investigation at Florida's Dozier School for Boys

    Summary
    The first phase of a new investigation of 27 possible graves near the former Dozier School for Boys found "no evidence of human remains," according to a joint statement issued Tuesday by the Florida Department of State and the University of South Florida.

    FDA issues warning to CBD company for 'unsubstantiated' health claims

    Summary
    In a move to crack down on the marketing of cannabis-related products, the US Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning letter to the company Curaleaf for selling some unapproved cannabidiol products with "unsubstantiated" health claims that the products treat cancer and Parkinson's disease, among other health conditions.

    Mueller makes last-minute ask to swear in deputy

    Summary
    Special counsel Robert Mueller made a last-minute request to have his deputy sworn in for Wednesday's House Judiciary Committee hearing in case he needed to answer any questions the special counsel could not fully answer himself, according to a source familiar with the matter.

    Coca-Cola will sell an alcoholic drink for the first time

    Summary
    For the first time in the company's history, Coca-Cola will sell an alcoholic beverage. Just don't count on it hitting US shelves anytime soon.

    Germany shooting: Eritrean attacked 'because of skin colour'

    Summary
    An Eritrean man was wounded in a drive-by shooting in what police condemn as a xenophobic attack.

    Boris Johnson 'faces challenging times' - EU's Ursula von der Leyen

    Summary
    Ursula von der Leyen is among Europe's leaders to react to Boris Johnson becoming the UK's new PM.

    How the rumour mill 'killed off' Turkmenistan's president

    Summary
    Fake news spread like wildfire this weekend in Turkmenistan - one of the most secretive states in the world.

    Henry Rotich arrest: Kenyan finance minister denies corruption charges

    Summary
    Henry Rotich is freed on bail after spending the night in police custody.

    Global growth forecast cut by IMF amid trade tensions

    Summary
    The Fund says growth "remains subdued", and trade and technology tensions need to be reduced.

    Singapore records its largest ever haul of smuggled ivory

    Summary
    Elephant ivory weighing 8.8 tonnes has been seized in Singapore, with authorities saying the haul is the biggest ever in the city-state's history.

    Unhatched birds can warn other eggs in nest of danger by vibrating

    Summary
    Unhatched baby seabirds can warn each other of impending danger by vibrating within their shells, scientists have discovered.

    Shackled Australians facing jail over 'cocaine use'

    Summary
    Two Australian men have been paraded in front of the media a week after being arrested in Bali on suspicion of cocaine use and possession.

    Drug-resistant malaria strains spread through south east Asia

    Summary
    Strains of drug-resistant malaria are becoming more dominant in Vietnam, Laos and northern Thailand after spreading rapidly from Cambodia.

    Oh my God, Mum, it's Messi!' Boy's delight at surprise holiday kickabout

    Summary
    An 11-year-old English boy has enjoyed the experience of a lifetime after playing beach football with Lionel Messi.

    Five Women Who Made the Moon Landing Possible

    Summary
    That “giant leap for mankind” happened thanks to plenty of women.

    Li Peng, Chinese Leader Derided for Role in Tiananmen Crackdown, Dies at 90

    Summary
    For decades, critics called for Mr. Li, who became known as the “butcher of Beijing,” to face trial or a public reckoning for his role in the 1989 bloodshed.

    Someday, an Arm Implant May Prevent H.I.V. Infection for a Year

    Summary
    In preliminary tests, a matchstick-size rod containing a new drug offered promise as a shield against the virus. But a large clinical trial must still be done.

    Indonesian Couple Carried Out Philippines Cathedral Bombing, Police Say

    Summary
    The two had reportedly tried to reach the Islamic State in Syria but were deported from Turkey. At least 23 people were killed in the attack.

    Afghanistan Recoils at Trump’s Comments About Destroying the Country

    Summary
    The government of President Ashraf Ghani demanded an explanation and said relations with Washington should be “grounded on common interests and mutual respect.”

    UK's Johnson will appoint David Frost as EU adviser: report

    Summary
    Incoming Prime Minister Boris Johnson will appoint David Frost as European Union sherpa and adviser on Europe, a Daily Telegraph reporter cited unidentified sources as indicating.

    Trump hopes to decide soon on when to release Mideast peace plan: envoy

    Summary
    U.S. President Donald Trump hopes to decide soon on when to release a plan for peace between Israel and the Palestinians that "will not be ambiguous," his Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt told the United Nations Security Council on Tuesday.

    Libya seizes Italian fishing vessel: Italy's Foreign Ministry

    Summary
    The Libyan coastguard has seized an Italian fishing vessel, Italy's Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday.

    Greta Thunberg to French MPs: you can ignore children, not scientists

    Summary
    Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg said on Tuesday it was ok for some members of the French parliament to ignore her and other children's warnings about global warming but she implored them to listen to scientists.

    EU warns incoming British PM Johnson it won't change Brexit terms

    Summary
    The European Union congratulated incoming British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Tuesday but warned of "challenging times ahead" and ruled out heeding his election pledge to renegotiate Brexit.

    Meet Boris Johnson, the man who called Trump "unfit" to be president

    Summary
    Britain's next prime minister is known for an off-beat brand of charisma, political opportunism, and promoting a hard Brexit

    Rare Amazon tribe captured on video

    Summary
    The clip filmed in the northern state of Maranhao shows members of the Awa tribe

    CENTCOM Commander: U.S. may have brought down more than one Iranian drone

    Summary
    CBS News' David Martin reports CENTCOM Commander Gen. Kenneth McKenzie suggested there were possibly two drones downed in the incident.

    Journalist Maria Ressa goes on trial in the Philippines

    Summary
    Ressa is accused of criminal libel, but she and supporters say the case is just President Rodrigo Duterte's effort to silence a critical, free press

    Behind the scenes of the Air Force's anti-terrorism drone program

    Summary
    600 pilots and 350 sensor or camera operators work in teams around the clock, averaging six air strikes and 1,000 combat hours every day

    ICE targeted thousands in raids, but so far has only arrested 35

    Summary
    The operations — widely publicized by President Trump — were focused on around 2,000 families with final orders of removal by an immigration judge.

    Beaches in L.A. County evacuated over lightning, safety concerns

    Summary
    Warnings are issued for Southern California's inland cities as the second heat wave of the summer is expected to bring dangerous humid weather.

    Mom gets prison for murder of child left in hot car to remove 'lustful demons'

    Summary
    Angela Phakhin, 29, was convicted of first-degree murder in the death of her daughter after she left the girl in a hot car for more than nine hours.

    Video showing kids smoking pot circulates on social media, prompting woman's arrest

    Summary
    The woman is charged with three felony counts of using a minor to sell marijuana and three misdemeanor counts of child endangerment.

    Dramatic FBI raids at L.A. City Hall and the DWP scandal that won't go away

    Summary
    An overbilling scandal earlier this decade at the Department of Water and Power is now the subject of an FBI probe. Here's what we know.


    Summary
    Well, if it's Jonathan Van Ness-approved...

    Trust no one? Americans lack faith in the government, the media and each other, survey finds

    Summary
    More than two-thirds say personal trust is also down and nearly 60% doubt adults can hold civil conversations on differing views, a Pew survey finds.

    Airbus designed a plane prototype to look like a 'bird of prey' – take a look

    Summary
    Airbus is working to inspire the latest and greatest in flight innovation – and using a "bird of prey" conceptual design to do so.

    Great public markets that serve up delicious city tastes

    Summary
    Public markets sell regional produce and products and offer plenty of dining options. Explore 10 markets around the world.

    Macy's 'body shaming' moms? See the 'mom jeans' plates removed from stores after backlash

    Summary
    Macy's agreed to pull plates they said "missed the mark" after people on social media complained they promoted body image issues.

    The ‘Special’ U.S.-U.K. Relationship is Bruised After Trump Officials Didn’t Tell Britain About Plans to Hit Iran

    Summary
    At the Aspen Institute’s annual gathering of national security and foreign policy leaders in July, the former acting CIA director, John McLaughlin, choked up as he recalled how British intelligence chiefs had traversed closed air space from London to Washington to literally embrace their American counterparts after the 9/11 attacks. McLaughlin and Sir John Scarlett, the former head of Britain’s MI6 spy agency sitting beside him, remembered fondly the “special relationship” the U.S. and U.K. had, a relationship that both agreed is troubled at a time when tension with Iran threatens to break into armed conflict. Britain announced Monday that it would form its own European-led patrol of Persian Gulf waters, where Iran seized a British oil tanker Saturday, rather than join an American-led effort. This follows the unprecedented decision by the Trump administration to withhold detailed information from Britain ahead of a planned U.S. military strike on Iran, later aborted, following the shooting down of an American drone. Senior administration officials confirm to TIME that they left the Brits out of the planning, conceding that was “unusual” but blaming it on the speed of the response. “It is not that common for us to execute operations unilaterally without them,” one of the officials said. “But in this case, because of the nature of the incident and the proposed response, it wasn’t an essential element.” And the Trump White House may act unilaterally without briefing the Brits in detail again, depending on the action needed to respond to Iranian aggression toward U.S. troops or interests in the region, they said, speaking anonymously in order to discuss the sensitive matter. President Donald Trump ultimately canceled the planned action, but the U.S. decision to withhold information sent a tremor through an alliance at least superficially dented by Trump’s Twitter attacks on outgoing British Prime Minister Theresa May, and by his savaging of the former British Ambassador to the U.S. Sir Kim Darroch, whose unflattering assessments of Trump’s administration were leaked in the British media and forced him to resign. [image: APTOPIX Iran Persian Gulf Tensions] Hasan Shirvani—APA speedboat and a helicopter of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard move around a British-flagged oil tanker MV Stena Impero on July 21, 2019, after it was seized by Iran in the Persian Gulf “Cowards,” one senior U.S. official said, summing up the Trump administration’s frustration with the Brits’ continued support for the Iran nuclear deal, their reluctance to confront Iran more directly and their attempts to help Iran bypass U.S. sanctions together with other European parties who remain in the nuclear deal. Former British Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith told the BBC that Theresa May had turned down a U.S. offer of help in the Persian Gulf before Iran seized Britain’s oil tanker, apparently demurring because SHE? it didn’t want to increase the risk of being drawn into an armed conflict. U.S. officials said Britain’s allegiance to the Iran nuclear deal explains its decision to reject joining “Operation Sentinel,” a fledgling plan by U.S. Central Command to organize an allied patrol of the Gulf waters. British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt announced on Monday that Britain would be forming its own “European-led maritime protection mission to support safe passage of crew and cargo,” after Iran’s seizure of the British-flagged oil tanker MV Stena Impero. The senior administration officials said they understood that Britain was trying to separate itself from the U.S. maximum pressure campaign on Iran, but that the European-led mission would still need U.S. intelligence and surveillance support, because the Americans have far more military assets in the region. The chill from Washington toward the Brits has also unnerved others in Europe who rely on Britain as their Trump whisperer. Many Europeans rely on Britain to check Trump’s worst impulses on the international stage — or at least to give them forewarning. U.S. officials in Europe also admitted they had been slow to share plans of their Iran response, giving what officials called uncharacteristically late notice of the planned strike on Iranian military targets after Tehran shot down a U.S. drone. Two senior U.S. officials said Acting Secretary of Defense Mark Esper had tried to mollify U.S. allies by explaining the U.S. strategy toward Iran at last month’s NATO summit in Brussels. But that explanation infuriated Britain even more, in that all NATO members got the same sanitized, okay-for-mass-distribution version, as opposed to the deeply detailed briefings the U.S. usually gives the U.K. The selection as Britain’s next prime minister of Boris Johnson, who created strong ties with the Trump administration during his time as May’s foreign secretary, may go a long way toward healing the political relationship. “We are eager to start trade negotiations …because we see a huge opportunity to maximize the relationship” once the new UK government settles in, one of the senior U.S. administration officials said. But the bewilderment and wariness of British national security officials will likely persist. Spokesmen in London and at the British embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to requests for comment. [image: The Conservative Party Announces Their New Leader And Prime Minister] Dan Kitwood—Getty Images Newly elected Conservative Party leader Boris Johnson outside the Conservative Leadership Headquarters on July 23, 2019 in London after being chosen the country’s next Prime Minister. At the Aspen Security Forum, held last week, a steady succession of former Bush and Obama officials, as well as some currently serving government officials, made their apologies to the British officials in attendance over Trump’s treatment of Ambassador Darroch. Darroch has himself been getting messages of support from around the world, according to those close to him. It didn’t help warm the chill when the four-star commander of the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command declared Japan as possibly the top U.S. ally in the world. “I would say not only is Japan our most important ally in the region, they might be indeed our most important ally on the globe,” Adm. Philip Davidson said to the forum. A British official could be seen having an intense conversation with him after the event. Republican Congressman Mac Thornberry of Texas, speaking in Aspen, blamed any lack of notice to the U.K. ahead of the potential military strike on the turmoil and imminent leadership turnover of the prime minister’s job. He said he and other Republican and Democratic lawmakers had visited Trump in advance of the potential military strike and urged the president not to allow Iran to divide the U.S. from its allies. “It is essential that whatever you do about this drone shoot down, that we do it with our allies to prevent them from splitting us,” he said in Aspen, “especially in my opinion, our closest ally around the world, and that’s the U.K.” Neither McLaughlin nor Scarlett, the former U.S. and British intelligence chiefs, seemed to think the message had gotten through. “It’s very important that the leadership on all sides understand the value of our…alliance…It’s a deep relationship,” said Scarlett. “Perhaps they didn’t really.” “I found it appalling that he insulted Theresa May,” McLaughlin said of Trump’s tweets lambasting May after it was revealed that her U.S. ambassador had called the Trump administration inept. “I don’t want to say it’s over because we can’t give up,” said McLaughlin of the U.K.-U.S. relationship. “But if we neglect allies, and we do it long enough, they’ll start to make their own arrangements.”

    Genius Red Wine Spill Cover-Up Is the Party Trick We’ve All Been Waiting For

    Summary
    As far as party experiences go, there’s nothing worse than having a drink spilled on you right as the fun is getting started. Especially when the drink is red wine and you’re wearing an all-white outfit. So when one woman fell victim to this exact scenario at the Ripon Races in Leeds, England this weekend, her friends decided to help her out by…pouring more wine on her? That’s right. According to Twitter user Eleanor Walton, after her all-white jumpsuit was sullied by an errant spill, her friends came to the rescue by soaking the jumpsuit with more red wine to create a tie-dye effect. “Would u believe someone spilt red wine all down my white outfit so my work girls SOAKED MY JUMPSUIT in the sink so now i have a red jumpsuit ahahahaha,” she tweeted. tie dye pic.twitter.com/RJOceN9PqG — eleanor walton🌙 (@eleanorwaltonn) July 20, 2019 Her friend Mia Williamson corroborated the story by sharing photos of Eleanor’s before and after looks. “So we’re 2 hours into the races, and El comes and tells me someone has spilt red wine down her… no problem,” she wrote. “Got some more red wine and fixed it and I think we’ve just made a new product to [Pretty Little Thing‘s] festival range.” so we’re 2 hours into the races, and el comes and tells me someone has spilt red wine down her… no problem. Got some more red wine and fixed it and I think we’ve just made a new product to PLTs festival range pic.twitter.com/fXnJKYfNc2 — mia williamson (@MiaWiliamson_) July 20, 2019 If this isn’t the ultimate party trick of 2019 than we don’t know what is.

    Someone Needs to Explain the Sorcery Responsible for This Pristine Burger Thousands of Miles From Where It Should Be

    Summary
    We have to chalk this one some serious kitchen magic: a flawless, still-wrapped In-N-Out burger was discovered over the weekend abandoned on a street in Jamaica, Queens in New York — 1,500 miles from the California home of the burger franchise, and nearly as far from any of its outposts in the six Western states where the popular chain operates. “Because our burgers are only cooked fresh to order in six states, it must have taken considerable planning for that burger to make the trip from the grill all the way to the Empire State,” vice president of operations Denny Warnick told the New York *Post*. Apparently, the double-double was first spotted by a California native, Lincoln Boehm, who told the *Post* the find “genuinely shook me to my core.” After all, New Yorkers have Shake Shack. In-N-Out, meanwhile, is considered a special homecoming treat for many Westerners. Burgers aren’t exactly easy to transport, especially for long-distance hauls, making it even more of a strange and surreal surprise. As Boehm’s friend David Gardner noted on Twitter, Boehm did not consume the burger, despite its flawless appearance. After thinking it through, the only plausible explanation seems to be that “it arrived here thanks to a super rich person on a private plane.” But why that block in Queens? And why just the one burger? The truth is out there. My buddy Lincoln found a perfectly wrapped In-N-Out burger… On the streets of Queens, New York! I AM FREAKING OUT pic.twitter.com/TZbGvLn9N0 — David Gardner (@byDavidGardner) July 20, 2019 UPDATE: For the conspiracy theorists among us, this is a screenshot showing time and location. Lincoln’s theory is that it arrived here thanks to a super rich person on a private plane pic.twitter.com/Z93gis0Yzr — David Gardner (@byDavidGardner) July 21, 2019

    World Leaders React to Boris Johnson Becoming the UK’s New Prime Minister

    Summary
    Boris Johnson will succeed Theresa May as the UK’s prime minister after he defeating Jeremy Hunt in a Conservative Party leadership race. World leaders have been showing their support on Twitter. President Trump was one of the first to congratulate Johnson by declaring: “He will be great!” Congratulations to Boris Johnson on becoming the new Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He will be great! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 23, 2019 Chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said he looked forward to working constructively with Johnson towards the divorce with the EU. Johnson was a lead figure in the campaign to leave the EU in the 2016 referendum, and has repeatedly said he will keep the option of a “no deal” Brexit (leaving the bloc with no arrangements about what the relationship will be like in the future) on the table. We look forward to working constructively w/ PM @BorisJohnson when he takes office, to facilitate the ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement and achieve an orderly #Brexit. We are ready also to rework the agreed Declaration on a new partnership in line with #EUCO guidelines. — Michel Barnier (@MichelBarnier) July 23, 2019 The Taoiseach (Irish PM), Leo Varadkar, also congratulated Johnson and said he looked forward to continuing Brexit talks and prevent a hard Irish border, the issue that has come to symbolize the challenges of Brexit. Congratulations to @borisjohnson on his election as party leader. Look forward to an early engagement on #Brexit, Northern Ireland and bilateral relations — Leo Varadkar (@LeoVaradkar) July 23, 2019 Nigel Farage asked if Johnson would stick to his “do or die” pledge to deliver Brexit by October 31 deadline. I wish @BorisJohnson well as Prime Minister with his do or die pledge to deliver Brexit on October 31st. Does he have the courage to deliver? — Nigel Farage (@Nigel_Farage) July 23, 2019 Italy’s interior minister Matteo Salvini, the leader of the far-right Lega, congratulated Johnson for being called “more dangerous than the Lega” by Tony Blair in an interview in Italian newspaper La Repubblica. “Well done Boris Johnson. The fact that the left portray you as being ‘more dangerous than the Lega’ makes you even more likable,” he tweeted. Buon lavoro a #BorisJohnson. Il fatto che da sinistra lo dipingano “più pericoloso della Lega” me lo rende ancor più simpatico😊@BorisJohnson pic.twitter.com/EjJUFDURv6 — Matteo Salvini (@matteosalvinimi) July 23, 2019 Ivanka Trump initially seemed to be mentioning the Jamaican capital when she congratulated Johnson on “becoming the next Prime Minister of the United Kingston.” The tweet has since been deleted, reported Politico, and a replaced with a corrected one. Congratulations @BorisJohnson on becoming the next Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. — Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 23, 2019

    Turns Out Leonardo DiCaprio Is a Very Skilled Crasher

    Summary
    Beyond acting, Leonardo DiCaprio’s true calling may be interrupting people. Especially Jimmy Kimmel. As Kimmel attempted to deliver his opening monologue during Monday’s episode of *Jimmy Kimmel Live!*, he was interrupted not only by DiCaprio, but also his *Once Upon a Time In Hollywood *co-stars Margot Robbie and Brad Pitt. But while Robbie and Pitt both got a sufficient rise out of the audience as they “cut through” the *Live! *set on their way to the *Once Upon a Time in Hollywood *premiere, it was DiCaprio who inspired the night’s loudest cheers. One man in the crowd could even be seen repeatedly bowing down to DiCaprio after he appeared on stage. And once he invited Kimmel’s entire audience to come with him to the premiere, the late-night host had no chance of regaining control. “It seems like a few of them do want to go so we’ll work that out,” Kimmel joked. Watch the full clip below.

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