Republican Arizona Senate candidate accuses opponent of being OK with 'treason'

    Summary
    Republican Rep. Martha McSally demanded an apology on Monday night from her Democratic opponent, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, at a debate in Arizona for what she called "treason," seizing on an element of a CNN report that details the Democrat's anti-war activist past.

    Welcome to the era of impunity

    Summary
    "It doesn't matter. We won."

    Cherokee Nation: Unhelpful to cling to DNA

    Summary
    Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. discusses why Sen. Elizabeth Warren's (D-MA) release of DNA test results suggesting that she has distant Native American heritage is problematic.

    First child in Florida has died of flu this season, state reports

    Summary
    A Florida child died due to flu-related illness during the week ended October 6, according to the state's Department of Health. The child, the first to die in the state, had not received a flu vaccination.

    Viking ship found buried in Norway

    Summary
    Using cutting-edge technology, archaeologists discovered a nearly 66-foot-long Viking ship buried in southern Norway.

    Ethiopia's Abiy gives half of ministerial posts to women

    Summary
    Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed says women are "less corrupt than men", as he explains his appointments.

    Idaho wildlife official resigns over dead baboon photo

    Summary
    A state wildlife commissioner has resigned amid an outcry over gruesome hunting photos.

    Nicaragua frees protesters after international outcry

    Summary
    Police release dozens of demonstrators they had detained after an anti-government demonstration.

    Pompeii: Vesuvius eruption may have been later than thought

    Summary
    Mount Vesuvius erupted on 24 August, 72 AD - or at least, that's what historians thought until now.

    High-profile fugitive who faked death 'arrested in France'

    Summary
    The suspect from Ukraine lived a lavish lifestyle and had bought a castle in France, officials say.

    Thai police dismiss British teenager's rape claim

    Summary
    Police in Thailand have dismissed a British tourist's claims she was drugged, raped and robbed on a resort island after their investigation found no supporting evidence.

    Prince William hosts hero cave divers

    Summary
    Prince William has told British cave divers who helped rescue 12 trapped boys in Thailand that the country is "very proud" of them.

    First shooting-free weekend in NYC for decades

    Summary
    There were no shootings in New York City last weekend - the first time this has happened in 25 years.

    Audi fined £700m over dieselgate scandal

    Summary
    Audi has been fined €800m (£700m) for failings that enabled the firm to sell almost five million diesel with software designed to cheat emissions testing.

    Who's in Trump's former presidents painting?

    Summary
    A painting of Donald Trump grinning at a table with past presidents is hanging in the White House, close to the Oval Office.

    Iran Widens an Already Huge Rift Between Europe and U.S.

    Summary
    Since President Trump announced that he would pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, European leaders are actively working to help Tehran get around new sanctions.

    In Jamal Khashoggi Case, Turkey Focuses on Movements of Saudi Officials

    Summary
    Two jets carrying Saudi intelligence agents are said to have flown to Istanbul the day the dissident journalist disappeared, and to have left hours later.

    Kim Jong-un Invites Pope Francis to North Korea

    Summary
    It seems unlikely that the Vatican would accept the offer from a country considered one of the worst suppressors of religious freedom.

    Rare White Tiger Kills Zookeeper in Japan

    Summary
    The episode, in the southern city of Kagoshima, was not the first fatal tiger attack at a Japanese zoo.

    U.S. Marine Colonel in Australia Relieved of Command After Drunken Driving

    Summary
    Col. James Schnelle, the highest ranking Marine Corps official in Australia, has been replaced after his arrest in Darwin last month.

    EU leaders prepare hardball Brexit summit choice for May

    Summary
    European Union leaders will give British Prime Minister Theresa May a tough reception in Brussels on Wednesday, warning her to rally support at home for the Brexit deal on offer or be cut loose without one in March.

    London Stock Exchange CEO Schwimmer pulls out of Saudi conference

    Summary
    London Stock Exchange chief executive David Schwimmer will no longer be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Saudi Arabia next week, a spokeswoman for the exchange said on Tuesday.

    BNP Paribas's chairman cancels attendance at Saudi Arabia's investment conference

    Summary
    BNP Paribas Chairman Jean Lemierre canceled his attendance at an investment conference in Saudi Arabia next week amid widespread concern about the fate of a Saudi journalist and the withdrawal of many other senior executives.

    Cameroon court hears calls for 'irregular' election to be annulled

    Summary
    Opposition candidates who say last week's presidential election in Cameroon was marred by fraud had their appeals heard at the country's Constitutional Council on Tuesday.

    Charcoal inscription points to date change for Pompeii eruption

    Summary
    The volcanic eruption that destroyed the ancient Roman city of Pompeii probably took place two months later than previously thought, Italian officials said on Tuesday.

    2 U.S. women found dead in Chile after suspected fall

    Summary
    Bodies of 25 and 23-year-old flown to nearest city for autopsies, but local fire official says bruising points to waterfall accident

    Pastor Andrew Brunson: "The problem is that I wasn't interrogated" in Turkey

    Summary
    An American pastor detained in Turkey for two years is beginning to re-adjust to life back in the U.S. Pastor Andrew Brunson was charged with espionage and links to a terrorist organization in 2016. He denies any wrongdoing. A Turkish court sentenced him to prison Friday, but released him on time served. Brunson lived in Turkey for more than 20 years and oversaw a Presbyterian church. President Trump welcomed him to the White House over the weekend, just after his return. Pastor Brunson joins "CBS This Morning" with his wife, Norine, to discuss their experiences. He says he's "one of the most hated people in Turkey" and he didn't know for 18 months why he was in prison.

    After baby news, (most) Australians warmly welcome Harry and Meghan

    Summary
    Recent poll shows Australians divided over whether to ditch British royals, but supporters see hope in the new generation

    Prince Harry and Meghan's first day in Australia a carefully planned charm offensive

    Summary
    Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, have officially started their first royal tour as a married couple. The day after announcing their first child is on the way, they were greeted by well-wishers in Sydney, Australia. But there are some Australians who question the need for the monarchy there. Jonathan Vigliotti reports from Sydney.

    Fran Townsend: Changing story on Khashoggi "belies the credibility of the Saudis"

    Summary
    CBS News senior national security analyst Fran Townsend, former homeland security and counterterrorism adviser for President George W. Bush, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi and why she says the Turkish haven't been playing it straight either.

    Trump tops $100 million in fundraising for his own reelection

    Summary

    Dead' Ukrainian found living lavishly in a castle

    Summary
    French police arrested an unnamed “high-profile” Ukrainian who used forged death certificates to evade the authorities, Europol said in a statement Tuesday. The fugitive, identified only as the “King of the Castle” by the European Union’s law-enforcement agency, was detained on Oct. 5 near Dijon,...

    Conor McGregor explains his awkward football throwing motion: I didn't want to rip my suit

    Summary
    Conor McGregor is the UFC’s biggest star. He’s compiled a 21-4 record and was the first fighter to simultaneously hold titles in two weight divisions. But he throws a football like a side-armed shot putter. Or at least that’s how it looked Sunday, when McGregor was hanging out with the Dallas Cowboys...

    Dodgers Dugout: Can someone give the Dodgers directions to the stadium? They didn't show up for Game 3

    Summary
    Hi, and welcome to another edition of Dodgers Dugout. My name is Houston Mitchell, and the less said about Game 3 the better. The NLCS OK, here’s what I don’t understand. How can a team with so much talent as the Dodgers have so many games this season where they just don’t show up? It looked like...

    Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean and Sam Hunt anchor the Stagecoach 2019 lineup

    Summary
    Two veteran headliners of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio will return next year and they will welcome a newcomer — Sam Hunt — into the rarefied company of acts chosen to top the bill at the world’s largest country music celebration. The “Body Like a Back Road” singer makes the jump...

    The Voice' contestant finally makes the show after auditioning since Season 1

    Summary
    It's been a long "Voice" road for Matt Johnson, who first auditioned for the NBC singing show in its inaugural season in 2011.

    Pippa Middleton gives birth to baby boy

    Summary
    Pippa Middleton gave birth to her first child, a first cousin to the little royals, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis of Cambridge.

    Mrs. America contestants accuse pageant co-founder of racist remarks, saying the N-word

    Summary
    Four former Mrs. America contestants are accusing pageant co-founder David Marmel of using the N-word and making racist stereotypes.

    Air India flight attendant falls out of plane, injures legs on tarmac

    Summary
    A 53-year old Air India flight attendant suffered serious injuries to her legs after she fell out of a Boeing 777's aft door while trying to close it.

    Military mom pulls off magical homecoming

    Summary
    The two kids thought they were simply seeing a magic show on Military Appreciation Day. Little did they know, the show was for them.

    Stephen Colbert ‘Interviews’ Donald Trump on ’60 Minutes of Lies’ Spoof

    Summary
    Stephen Colbert interviews Trump again? Not exactly? For the latest Colbert Trump spoof, Stephen Colbert “sat down” with Donald Trump for “an interview” that might look pretty familiar to anyone who saw the president’s appearance on *60 Minutes*. *The Late Show* staff spliced together an interview between the president and the late night talk show host by editing in Colbert’s questions and pairing them with answers gleaned from Trump’s sit-down with Lesley Stahl on *60 Minutes. *The end result was what Colbert called, “My interview of Lesley Stahl’s interview of President Trump.” In the spoof of an interview, Colbert notes that Trump has been president for two years and Trump notes, “There’s something really terrible and disgusting about that” and Colbert wholeheartedly agrees. Colbert then turns to asks Trump questions what he thinks of his sons Donald Jr. and Eric and Trump earnestly replies, “They’re ridiculous.” When asked about who he would choose to replace Jeff Sessions as head of the Justice Department, the president answered equally earnestly, “Pillows and blankets.” After grilling him about international affairs, Colbert asks him if he will ever tell the truth and Trump shakes his head, “Don’t count on it.”

    ‘It’s Torture’: Floridians Are Still Desperately Searching for Loved Ones Missing After Hurricane Michael

    Summary
    (PANAMA CITY, Fla.) — Joanne Garone Behnke has replayed every possible scenario in her mind a hundred times. Maybe her 79-year-old aunt sought shelter at the sturdy condo nearby that withstood Hurricane Michael’s devastating winds. Maybe she was rescued and is lying in a hospital bed somewhere. The pile of rubble that was once her Mexico Beach home is shallow, too shallow for a body to go unnoticed, Garone Behnke tells herself. “It’s torture,” says Garone Behnke, who last talked to her aunt Aggie Vicari right before the storm hit, begging her to leave her cinderblock home. Days after the hurricane slammed into the Florida Panhandle, people are struggling to locate friends and loved ones who haven’t been heard from. How many are missing seems to be anyone’s guess. “I’ve been on the phone to reporters, to fire chiefs, to heads of task force from Miami, to you name it, I’ve called them. I’ve called every hospital,” Garone Behnke said Monday, then stopped to look at a text from the fire chief in Mexico Beach. To her disappointment, it read: “We’re still working on it … we’ll keep you posted.” As President Donald Trump visited the devastated zone, the death toll from Michael’s march from Florida to Virginia stood at 17, and the search for victims continued. As the hurricane closed in and more than 375,000 people were warned to evacuate, emergency authorities expressed frustration that many residents weren’t leaving. Since the storm, many people have been rescued from the devastated zones. Emergency officials said that because of widespread cellphone outages, others could be safe and just haven’t been able to tell friends or family. Rescue worker Trevor Lewis and the rest of his six-member squad lent their cellphones to storm victims so that they could contact loved ones for the first time in days. He said he watched them “cry out in joy.” “Just the desperation in the family members’ voices that hadn’t contacted their loved one for a few days was bad,” he said. “Then we get on scene and find their family members and they have no food, no water, no power.” There was just one confirmed death so far in Mexico Beach, the town of about 1,000 people that was nearly wiped off the map in a direct hit from the hurricane and its 155 mph (250 kph) winds. Mexico Beach City Clerk Adrian Welle told local media Sunday that 46 people were unaccounted for. That number had previously been 285, but officials think many left right before the storm hit. Other city officials told reporters that the number of unaccounted for was three. A Houston-based organization called CrowdSource Rescue that takes calls from worried family members and sends the details to rescue crews on the ground said it has helped find nearly 1,500 people across the region since Michael struck. George Ruiz, a former Coast Guard rescue boat driver from Alabama who runs Geaux Rescue, a nonprofit search-and-rescue operation, said rescue efforts were hamstrung because authorities aren’t allowing volunteer groups into hard-hit Mexico Beach and Panama City. He stressed he did not blame local officials. “There’s a lot of work to be done still as far as the rescue and recovery goes,” said Ruiz, whose organization still has 433 requests for help from family members looking for loved ones. “We listened to voicemails we received overnight,” he said, “and you can just hear in their voice their desperation, wanting to know if their family member is alive and well or if their family member has passed.” Melissa and Rodney Reinhardt spent days wondering whether Rodney’s 79-year-old father survived the storm at his home in the devastated Port St. Joe area. “Our hope was that he evacuated but nobody had heard from him,” she said. “It’s horrifying not knowing. It’s scary. Seeing the pictures on the news makes it even scarier.” Emergency officials checked on him Thursday night and said he was there, but that was all the information they received. Rodney finally went in with a church group on Sunday and picked him up. “It was a happy ending,” Melissa Reinhardt said. During his visit to the devastated zone, Trump commended Republican Gov. Rick Scott for an “incredible” response to the disaster and said: “You’re a great governor.” Scott, who is running for the U.S. Senate, returned the praise, saying, “Every time I’ve called, he’s come through.” Some in the affected area were lukewarm about the president’s visit. About 5 miles from a neighborhood Trump visited, 57-year-old Sheila Vann sat on a cooler in her garage, taking a break from cleaning up. The hurricane tore off much of her roof in Panama City, and most of her ceiling collapsed. She had four freezers filled with fish and meat that were starting to spoil and smell. “You want to see the president?” Vann asked her husband, Joseph, with a dismissive tone. “I ain’t got time, unless he wants to help clean up.” Nanya Thompson, 68, of Lynn Haven, said of the president: “He’s doing this, I believe, to project a different image of himself because of all the bad publicity he’s had. He’s not going into get into the sewage water with other people and start digging.” “If this is just going to be another reality show, I don’t think he should come,” she added. ___ Contributors in Florida include Associated Press writers Russ Bynum in Mexico Beach, Brendan Farrington in Panama City, Gary Fineout in Tallahassee, Kelli Kennedy in Miami and AP Photographer Gerald Herbert in Panama City.

    A Ukrainian Who Faked His Own Death Was Recently Found Living in a Castle with a Rolls Royce

    Summary
    (Bloomberg) — French police arrested an unnamed “high-profile” Ukrainian who used forged death certificates to evade the authorities, Europol said in a statement Tuesday. The fugitive, identified only as the “King of the Castle” by the European Union’s law-enforcement agency, was detained on Oct. 5 near Dijon, according to the statement. Officers recovered 4.6 million euros ($5.3 million) of property, including a castle, a vintage Rolls Royce Phantom and three works of art by Salvador Dali. “The suspect is thought to be behind a complex case of international fraud and money laundering,” Europol said. French police began investigations in January over alleged suspicious transactions relating to the purchase of the castle for 3 million euros by a company in Luxembourg “whose ultimate beneficial owner was a Ukrainian citizen suspected of corruption at a large scale in his country,” according to the statement. The man was detained with three accomplices, according to the Hague-based agency, which said it had coordinated with French, Ukrainian and Luxembourg authorities to establish that the suspect who’d used false death certificates “was not only alive, but was enjoying a lavish lifestyle in France.” French @Gendarmerie arrest Ukrainian ‘King of the Castle’ and seized over EUR 4 million, with Europol's support. The suspect is thought to be behind a complex case of international #fraud and #moneylaundering. Read more: https://t.co/esIVkLwzDN pic.twitter.com/vC6LHzO3g3 — Europol (@Europol) October 16, 2018 The arrests highlight how graft remains a key political issue for Ukraine even after a 2014 revolution that toppled then-President Viktor Yanukovych and exposed massive government corruption and bribery. The International Monetary Fund made the creation of an anti-corruption court a condition of unlocking its $17.5 billion bailout. Non-residents based in Ukraine were among customers implicated in about 200 billion euros that flowed through the Estonian unit of Danske Bank A/S between 2007 and 2015, much of which the lender regarded as suspicious. Ukraine ranked 130th with Sierra Leone and Myanmar in the latest Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, lower than any European country except Russia. Iaroslav Trakalo, a spokesman for Ukraine’s police, and Andriy Lysenko, of the Prosecutor General’s press service, were unable to comment immediately. — With assistance from Gaspard Sebag.

    Daring Escape by ‘Taylor Swift’ the Zoo Animal Results in Evacuation

    Summary
    An adventurous namesake of Taylor Swift‘s lived out her wildest dreams when she escaped her enclosure at the Sacramento Zoo on Sunday. According to *CBS Sacramento*, Taylor Swift, a bongo antelope calf, broke out of her space that she shares with her mother, Penny and then made her way into a common area, to presumably assemble a squad of model best friends. Unfortunately for Swift the Bongo, however, the zoo staff staged an intervention by evacuating visitors the space so they could safely capture and return Swift to her enclosure. In a press release, the zoo revealed that Taylor Swift returned to her enclosure within 15 minutes of her breakout and that the Bongo did not experience any major injuries from her escape. The zoo staff does not know how or why Taylor Swift was able to escape her exhibit space. Taylor Swift the singer has not yet weighed in on the matter.

    This Statewide Elected Office Has Drawn Unusual Interest From Democrats

    Summary
    In most states, the office of secretary of state is far from glamorous. Though the duties vary, it’s largely an administrative role involving keeping records and issuing licenses. But Democrats have made it a priority this November because of another role: handling elections. As fights over voting rights has intensified in recent years, Democrats have come to see secretaries of state as a key post in both staving off new restrictions and expanding efforts to make it easier to vote. In 40 states, including 80% of the states where the officials are voted into office, the secretary of state is also the chief election official. The Democratic Association of Secretaries of State is raising “seven figures in seven states”: Arizona, Ohio, Nevada, Colorado, Iowa, Georgia and Michigan. Alex Padilla, the president of DASS and California’s Secretary of State says the Democratic candidates in those races will support initiatives like automatic voter registration, pre-registration for teenagers, and the expansion of programs like vote-by-mail, as opposed to those more often championed by Republicans including implementing voter ID and cross-checking voter registrations with other state databases. “The specific actions and agendas we’ve seen put in place by our Republican counterparts, from making it harder to cast a ballot and making it harder to register,” says Padilla, “are about as small-d undemocratic and un-American as it gets.” Republicans, who hold the about two-thirds of all secretary of state offices, reject the argument that their policies are unduly restrictive. This isn’t the first time partisan groups have taken concerted steps to determine who is elected secretary of state. Interest in the power of the secretary of state office piqued after the 2000 election when then-Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris oversaw the presidential recount while also serving as co-chair of the Bush campaign in the state. Harris was also linked to a controversial voter roll purge that incorrectly labeled thousands of voters as felons. A disproportionate percentage of those voters were African-American and deemed ineligible to vote. “Since the 2000 election, it’s become very clear that in very close elections the rules of the game matter,” says Rick Hasen, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine and a election law expert. “And because many states use partisan election officials for their chief elections officers, it’s not a surprise that people are fighting over the person who gets to control at least part of the process of conducting elections.” After that election, says Wendy Weiser, the director of the Democracy Program at the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law, state officials began experimenting with changes to the rules, though the most widespread changes came after the 2010 election. Since then, 23 states have enacted laws that make it harder to vote. Thirty-four states have voter ID laws, and 10 have strict laws about what kind of documentation you need to vote. “One of the major problems is the fact that there are people who are setting the rules and who are administering the rules that actually have a dog in the fight, who actually care about who participates and who doesn’t participate,” says Weiser. “People are coming into office and wanting to set the rules to benefit their own supporters.” Georgia’s Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp, who also serves as Secretary of State, has faced similar accusations amid a close election. Kemp is facing a lawsuit from voting rights groups who have accused his office of blocking some 50,000 mostly black, Latino and Asian-American voters from registering. Because his office is in charge of carrying out the law — and because his opponent, Stacey Abrams, could become the nation’s first African American female governor — the suit accuses him of trying to suppress minority turnout ahead of the election. “I think the Republicans have really used that, when they take over these offices, as a way to advance their partisan interests,” says Ellen Kurz, the president of iVote. “They’re not trying to let the voters pick their elected leaders, they’re trying to pick their voters.” This cycle, iVote plans to spend at least $7 million in support of Democratic candidates, says Kurz. Democrats and voting rights advocates have often successfully used the law to try to block “nefarious” techniques she says are designed to suppress voters. “But we don’t want to wait until people are pushed off the rolls,” she says of this year’s effort. “We wanted to be on the offensive.” Republicans, on the other hand, are hoping to maintain control over the majority of offices as a part of a longstanding effort they say is aimed at maintaining integrity of the voting system. The Republican State Leadership Committee, which hosts a committee that has helped elect Republican secretaries of state — there are 30 currently in office — plans to spend nearly $50 million at the state level this cycle, which includes spending for secretaries of state races. In a statement, RSLC Communications Director David James refuted the assertion that Republicans use their positions to restrict ballot access and block minorities from voting. Democratic candidates support “chaos and disarray at the ballot box to rig the system for Democrats,” he said. “Meanwhile, the Republican Secretaries of State Committee continues its commitment to electing Republican secretaries of state that preserve the integrity of elections, while expanding access at the ballot box,” says James. “iVote joins a constellation of liberal Democrat groups, up and down state-level campaigns, spending at fever-pitch levels like that of a party facing political death in many offices this November.”

`