Bernstein: Trump has lied at every turn about Russia

    Summary
    Veteran journalist Carl Bernstein discusses the truthfulness of President Donald Trump with CNN's Brian Stelter.

    UFC star cements his greatness in 32 seconds

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    QB could get NFL's first $200M contract

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    They no longer wanted to live on Confederate Avenue. Here's what they did about it

    Summary
    Tiffany Friesen is still getting used to her new address. Out of habit, she sometimes says she lives on Confederate Avenue, where she and her husband Atiba Mbiwan have been for years.

    Opinion: Nancy Pelosi should negotiate with Ann Coulter

    Summary
    Donald Trump made a public offer on Saturday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Congressional Democrats in an effort to end the longest government shutdown. He proposed to extend protection for DACA recipients and individuals with Temporary Protected Status in exchange for funding for his beloved wall (yes, the same wall he promised that Mexico would pay for).

    Why are there fuel shortages in Mexico?

    Summary
    After a deadly pipeline blast, a new policy designed to crack down on fuel theft is drawing scrutiny.

    Tony Mendez, the real CIA spy behind Argo dies aged 78

    Summary
    Tony Mendez is best known for a daring rescue mission which inspired a film by Ben Affleck.

    US shutdown: Trump angered by Democrats' rejection of 'compromise'

    Summary
    The president says they dismissed his plan to end a government shutdown before he even presented it.

    Macedonia and Greece: Clashes in Athens over neighbour's name change

    Summary
    Tens of thousands rally in Athens to oppose ratification of a deal on the Macedonia name issue.

    Israel's PM Netanyahu signs deals with Chad's President Deby

    Summary
    Israel and Chad renew diplomatic ties in Israel's latest move to strengthen links with Africa.

    Toddler 'surrenders' to armed police arresting suspects

    Summary
    Footage has gone viral of the moment a barefooted toddler walked towards armed police with her hands up after officers pulled over a couple of suspected shoplifters in Florida.

    World's oldest man dies aged 113

    Summary
    The world's oldest man has died at his home in northern Japan at the age of 113, his family has said.

    Bomb blast at military checkpoint in Damascus

    Summary
    A bomb has exploded outside a military checkpoint in the Syrian capital Damascus.

    Fire kills two in ski resort popular with Brits

    Summary
    Two people have been killed after a large fire broke out in the upmarket French ski resort of Courchevel.

    Three killed in bus bomb near Damascus

    Summary
    Three civilians have died after a bomb left on a bus exploded outside a military intelligence office near Damascus.

    Northern Ireland Car Bombing Leads to Two Arrests

    Summary
    The device caused no casualties or major damage, but after receiving a warning, the police evacuated children from a youth club and hundreds of people from a hotel and a masonic hall before the explosion.

    Prince Philip, Seen Driving Days After Crash, Gets ‘Advice’ From British Police

    Summary
    The husband of Queen Elizabeth II was photographed behind the wheel of another Land Rover, two days after he was involved in a car crash that injured two women.

    Clashes and Tear Gas in Greece as Thousands Protest Macedonia Deal

    Summary
    Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Athens on Sunday, days before lawmakers vote on whether to ratify an agreement to rename the country’s northern neighbor North Macedonia.

    Norway and Canada Go Head to Head Over the World’s Tallest Moose Statues

    Summary
    Canada was bested by Norway for bragging rights to the world’s tallest moose sculpture. Now Canadians are raising money to make Mac the Moose great again.

    Congo Court Affirms Results of Contested Presidential Election

    Summary
    The court backed an electoral commission’s result showing that the opposition candidate Félix Tshisekedi was the winner, rejecting a challenge from the runner-up.

    Israel and Chad revive diplomatic relations, call for closer security ties

    Summary
    Israel confirmed a diplomatic rapprochement with Muslim-majority Chad on Sunday as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu used a visit to the Chadian capital to stress their mutual interest in confronting Islamist insurgencies.

    Arab economic summit in Beirut urges Syrian refugee returns

    Summary
    Arab states at an economic summit in Beirut called on world powers on Sunday to step up efforts to enable Syrian refugees to return home.

    Senator Graham urges Trump to meet Pakistan PM Khan

    Summary
    Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said on Sunday President Donald Trump should meet Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan as soon as possible to reset long-difficult U.S. relations with Pakistan and push for a peaceful settlement in Afghanistan.

    No politics please for Baghdad bikers aiming to unite Iraq

    Summary
    Roaring along Baghdad's highways, the "Iraq Bikers" are doing more than showing off their love of outsized motorcycles and black leather: they want their shared enthusiasm to help heal Iraq's deep sectarian rifts.

    Facebook backs election integrity, AI initiatives in Germany

    Summary
    Facebook has launched German initiatives to defend election integrity and examine the ethics of artificial intelligence (AI), its operations chief said on Sunday, seeking to convince skeptics it is serious about privacy and democracy.

    Report from Northern Syria: Suicide bombing shows ISIS is evolving

    Summary
    CBS News Foreign Correspondent Charlie D’Agata reports from Northern Syria where a suicide attack in the northern city of Manbij claimed the lives of four Americans this week.

    Almanac: The English Channel Tunnel

    Summary
    On January 20, 1986, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterand broke new ground on the long-dreamed-of "Chunnel"

    Almanac: The "Chunnel"

    Summary
    On January 20, 1986, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterand broke new ground on the long-dreamed-of tunnel connecting England and France. Jane Pauley reports.

    Deported from the U.S., now answering your calls

    Summary
    When U.S. consumers call about a hotel reservation or an airline flight, there's a good chance a deportee in El Salvador is on the other end of the line

    Man recalls freeing Prince Phillip from crashed SUV, baby from 2nd car

    Summary
    Witness says ​he was driving home from work when the accident involving Philip's Land Rover and a compact car unfolded in front of him

    LAUSD teachers' strike: Marathon weekend bargaining sessions continue

    Summary
    Teams from the teachers union and the L.A. Unified School District are working long hours this weekend to settle a teachers’ strike that has so far cost students five days of normal instruction. On Saturday, they met at City Hall for nearly 12 hours, from 10:57 a.m. to 10:28 p.m. They were expected...

    Box office: ‘Glass’ wins the weekend while anime ‘Dragon Ball Super: Broly’ cracks top four

    Summary
    Universal’s “Glass” opened in first place at the box office with $40.6 million over the weekend, according to estimates from measurement firm Comscore. The latest from director M. Night Shyamalan, the $20-million film is a crossover featuring characters from his 2000 film “Unbreakable” and 2017’s...

    Los Angeles Rams vs. New Orleans Saints in NFL playoffs: Live updates, score

    Summary
    The Los Angeles Rams square off against the New Orleans Saints in the NFC championship game. Be sure to join us for live score updates, highlights and analysis throughout the game, which starts at 12:05 p.m. PST. The winner will advance to Super Bowl LIII in Atlanta to play against either the New...

    Floyd Mayweather Jr. feigns indifference to Manny Pacquiao rematch, but we've seen this before

    Summary
    The stubborn defiance is nothing new. The position of contentment in retirement that Floyd Mayweather Jr. expresses now was seen before in 2008, 2012 and 2015. Each time, when the riches of an enticing prizefight beckoned, he climbed back into the ring. So to see Mayweather (50-0) feign indifference...

    High school basketball: Saturday's scores

    Summary
    BOYS' BASKETBALL Bloomington Christian 44, Lake Arrowhead Christian 30 Camarillo 75, Mater Dei 71 Cathedral 100, Arcadia 62 Claremont 72, Shadow Hills 56 El Camino Real 65, Rolling Hills Prep 50 Framingham (Mass.) Philip 54, CSDR 49 Heritage Christian 93, Campbell Hall 62 Kaiser 90, Tahquitz 51 ...

    Police chastise Prince Philip for driving without seatbelt, just two days after crash

    Summary
    U.K. police have spoken with Prince Philip after Queen Elizabeth II's husband was photographed driving without a seatbelt, just two days after wreck.

    Report: Facebook’s privacy lapses may result in record fine from FTC

    Summary
    The Cambridge Analytica scandal could result in Facebook facing the largest fine ever imposed by the Federal Trade Commission.

    Facing populist assault, global elites regroup in Davos, without US delegation

    Summary
    The annual World Economic Forum prepares to open -- and readies to face potential criticism amid growing global populism.

    Fiorentina snatches 3-3 draw against Samp after dramatic end

    Summary
    Luis Muriel marked his return to Serie A by scoring two goals against his former club to help 10-man Fiorentina draw 3-3 against Sampdoria after a dramatic finale

    Is Nashville ready for a MLB franchise? Meet the man with a plan

    Summary
    Nashville has been floated as a possible future Major League Baseball expansion city. Could the city support it? Build a stadium? Make it work?

    President Trump and Kim Jung Un Are Planning to Meet in Vietnam in February for Their Second Summit

    Summary
     Administration officials are planning for President Donald Trump’s second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to take place in Vietnam, said people familiar with the plans. The White House announced on Friday that Trump would meet Kim in late February, following a 90-minute meeting between the president and Kim Yong Chol, one of the North Korean leader’s top aides. The pair discussed denuclearization and a second summit, the White House said at the time. Kim Yong Chol also met Friday with Secretary of State Michael Pompeo. Trump and Kim held their first meeting in Singapore in June. The February summit is likely to take place in Hanoi, the capital, but Danang, site of the 2017 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting, and Ho Chi Minh City in the country’s south have also been discussed as possible venues. Neither the administration nor the North Koreans offered much else after Friday’s meetings about what they’d agreed to and what would be gained from the planned summit. That only raised more questions because so little progress has been made toward the U.S.’s ultimate goal — getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons — since the first meeting between Trump and Kim. The prospect of another meeting with Kim, the enigmatic leader with whom Trump’s struck an unlikely rapport, offered him a departure from the partisan stalemate over the U.S. government shutdown and the continued drip of investigations into his Russia dealings. The president basked in the aftermath of the first summit, when he declared North Korea that was no longer a nuclear threat. Why Trump Holds the Cards on North Korea Sanctions: QuickTake Still, more than seven months later, North Korea has made no commitments to allow weapons inspections or dismantle its growing arsenal of warheads and intercontinental ballistic missiles. The announcement about the second summit suggested that the U.S. was softening its refusal to relax sanctions against North Korea because Kim had earlier this month threatened to walk away from talks if Trump didn’t compromise.

    ‘We Are All Stakeholders of Our Global Future’: Klaus Schwab, Founder of the World Economic Forum, Talks Change and Progress

    Summary
    Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum, sat down with TIME to discuss a sweeping vision for a rapidly changing world ahead of this year’s summit, which will begin in Davos, Switzerland on Tuesday. “Big issues in the world cannot be solved by governments alone,” Schwab said, speaking with TIME Editor-in-Chief and CEO Edward Felsenthal and National Correspondent Haley Sweetland Edwards in December. Decades ago, Schwab helped define “stakeholder theory,” which holds that businesses are not only responsible to their shareholders, but also to the wider array of “stakeholders” — employees, governments, customers and others — that it impacts. “Business has a big role to play. Civil Society has a big role to play. So we are all stakeholders of our global future,” he said. For Schwab, securing the future requires that we embrace change, rather than shy away from it. “What today I think is dividing society is the gap between those who embrace change, who look forward, who have a constructive approach to life, who know that we have to adapt our institutions, and those who want to retreat to a ‘good old world,’ which in practice doesn’t anymore exist,” he said

    4 Arizona Women Convicted for Leaving Water for Migrants

    Summary
    Four aid workers were convicted Friday on charges connected to their efforts to leave food and water for migrants in an Arizona wildlife refuge along the U.S.-Mexico border. The volunteers, who are members of the faith-based humanitarian aid group No More Deaths, were caught on Aug. 13, 2017, by a Federal Wildlife officer as they left water jugs, beans and other supplies for migrants in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a 50-mile border with Mexico. No More Deaths claims that 155 migrants have died in the refuge since 2001, and that the organization aims to save lives by providing basic supplies. The judge, United States Magistrate Bernardo P. Velasco, ruled that three of the volunteers – Oona Holcomb, Madeline Huse and Zaachila Orozco-McCormick – were convicted of entering a national wildlife refuge without a permit and abandoning personal property or possessions. A fourth volunteer, Natalie Hoffman, was convicted on an additional charge of operating a motor vehicle in a wilderness area. Each of the volunteers faces up to six months in prison. The decision is the first conviction against humanitarian aid volunteers in a decade, the Associated Press reported. Velasco wrote in his verdict that the women had failed to get permits for expanded access to the wildlife refuge, had gone off the roads where they are allowed to travel and left behind their belongings. The verdict said that their actions “[erode] the national decision to maintain the refuge in its pristine nature.” No More Deaths responded to Velasco’s verdict by claiming that the decision is part of a larger crisis of conscience in the U.S. Catherine Gaffney, a volunteer for the organization, said that the four volunteers were driven by moral principles. “This verdict challenges not only No More Deaths volunteers, but people of conscience throughout the country. If giving water to someone dying of thirst is illegal, what humanity is left in the law of this country?” Gaffney said. Five other humanitarian aid volunteers are also facing trial later this winter on similar charges, the nonprofit said. The judge rejected several defenses the volunteers used to explain their actions, including a defense that they had been acting on their “moral, ethical and spiritual belief to help other people in need.” He also rejected the claim that an Assistant United States Attorney had deliberately misled the organization by telling them that the Department of Justice did not plan to prosecute aid workers. Velasco went on to chastise the organization for misleading the volunteers about the legal risks they faced. “Each one acted on the mistaken belief that the worst that could happen was that they could be banned, debarred… or fined,” he wrote in his verdict. “No one in charge of No More Deaths ever informed them that their conduct could be prosecuted as a criminal offense nor did any of the Defendants make any independent inquiry into the legality or consequences of their activities.” In response to the verdict, No More Deaths announced that it would hold a vigil outside of Eloy Detention Center in Arizona on Saturday night. The 4 aid workers are among 9 #NMD volunteers facing charges for their efforts to place food and water on the Cabeza Prieta Wildlife Refuge, a vast and remote area near Ajo, AZ where 155 border crossers are known to have died since 2001 and countless more have disappeared. pic.twitter.com/mnHR7hHknZ — No More Deaths (@NoMoreDeaths) January 19, 2019

    Roger Federer Defeated By 20-Year-Old Stefanos Tsitsipas in Australian Open

    Summary
    (MELBOURNE, Australia) — Even as his uninterrupted dominance of yore dissipated, even as he took the occasional break, Roger Federer always mattered more often than not in the closing days of Grand Slam tournaments. Until lately, that is. Until, at age 37, he was outplayed in the Australian Open’s fourth round by a much younger man, 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas, during a 6-7 (11), 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (5) surprise that ended Federer’s bid for a third consecutive championship at Melbourne Park. “I have massive regrets,” said Federer, who failed to convert any of the 12 break points he earned against Tsitsipas, the first player from Greece to reach a major quarterfinal. This loss makes it a fourth straight Slam without Federer in the semifinals: He skipped the 2018 French Open, was beaten at Wimbledon in the quarterfinals and exited the U.S. Open in the fourth round. That is his longest such drought since he claimed the first of his men’s record 20 major titles, all the way back in 2003 at Wimbledon. “Roger is a legend of our sport. So much respect for him. He showed such good tennis over the years. I’ve been idolizing him since the age of 6,” said Tsitsipas, who has worked with Serena Williams’ coach, Patrick Mouratoglou. “It was a dream come true for me … just facing him,” Tsitsipas said about Federer. “Winning at the end? I cannot describe it, you know.” Federer was the oldest man left in the field and would have been the oldest quarterfinalist in Australia since Ken Rosewall at 43 in 1977. Tsitsipas, a lanky guy who kept his scraggly hair in place with a pink headband, was the youngest to make the fourth round this year. He lost his opening match in Melbourne a year ago, when Federer picked up his sixth Australian Open championship. “For sure, it’s a good win against Roger. I mean, we all know who Roger Federer is, what he has done in tennis. But I still have to keep my focus, keep my concentration on further goals that I want to achieve. That’s a very good beginning. I need to stay humble,” said Tsitsipas, who next faces another player making his quarterfinal debut at a major, No. 22 Roberto Bautista Agut of Spain. “This win is a good milestone, let’s say good first step, as I said, to something bigger.” At least Federer was able to crack a joke when asked whether Tsitsipas reminds him of a younger version of himself, replying: “He has a one-handed backhand. And I used to have long hair, too.” And before anyone writes off Federer just yet, remember that folks have kept trying to do that for quite some time, and he has repeatedly returned to title-winning form. After this setback, Federer announced that he would return to playing the clay-court circuit this season, including the French Open after missing it the past three years. This match was a thriller from beginning to end, both in terms of the high quality and entertaining style of play from both men — something long expected of Federer. The world is still learning what the 14th-seeded Tsitsipas can do. His soft hands serve him well on volleys, and he is that rare man who will press forward as often as Federer and have nearly as much success. On this cool evening, Tsitsipas won the point on 48 of 68 trips to the net, while Federer went 50 for 66. The kid served well, too, compiling a 20-12 edge in aces and, more significantly, staving off all of those break chances that Federer earned: two in the first set, eight in the second, two in the third. In the opening game of the match, Tsitsipas twice was called for a time violation after allowing the 25-second serve clock — new in Melbourne’s main draw this year — to expire. The second such warning resulted in the loss of a serve, and Tsitsipas proceeded to double-fault, offering up a break point to Federer. Tsisipas erased that chance with a 123 mph (198 kph) serve initially called out, then reversed on a challenge. Federer insisted to chair umpire James Keothavong that they should replay the point, a request that was denied, drawing the Swiss star’s ire. That would signal a pattern. At each key juncture, either Federer blinked or Tsitsipas delivered something special. “Hung in there, gave himself chances at some points, stayed calm. It’s not always easy, especially for younger guys,” said Federer, who was trying to reach his 54th Grand Slam quarterfinal. “Credit to him for taking care of that.” Tsitsipas never even collected a break point of his own until the third set, and the match was nearly 3 hours old when he finally cashed one in, the only one he would need, when Federer pushed a forehand into the net. The crowd, sensing something special, broke into a chorus of “Tsi-tsi-pas! Tsi-tsi-pas!” As is often the case when a youngster outdoes an old master, there was buzz about whether this might signal something more meaningful than one result. Each member of the sport’s long-ruling Big Three — Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic — already had dismissed challenges from the next generation at this tournament. This, though, was different. Tsitsipas is different. “I see him being high up in the game,” Federer said, “for a long time.”

    United Kingdom Faces ‘Political Tsunami’ If Brexit Is Halted, British Minister Says

    Summary
    (LONDON) — A senior British opposition politician said Sunday that it’s unlikely the U.K. will leave the European Union as scheduled on March 29, while a government minister warned that failure to deliver on Brexit would betray voters and unleash a “political tsunami.” The Brexit process has been deadlocked since Prime Minister Theresa May’s divorce deal with the EU was rejected by Parliament last week. Some lawmakers are pushing for the U.K. to delay its departure until politicians can agree on a way forward. Labour Party Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer said “it’s inevitable” Britain will have to ask the EU to extend the two-year Brexit countdown that ends on March 29. “The 29th of March is 68 days away,” Starmer told the BBC. “We are absolutely not prepared for it. It would be catastrophic.” Britain’s political impasse over Brexit is fueling concerns that the country may crash out of the EU on March 29 with no agreement in place to cushion the shock. That could see tariffs imposed on goods moving between Britain and the EU, sparking gridlock at ports and shortages of essential supplies. Many economists expect Britain to plunge into recession if there is a “no-deal” Brexit. May’s government is split between ministers who think a “no-deal” Brexit must be avoided at all casts, and Brexit-backers who believe it would be preferable to delaying or reversing Brexit. Former Brexit secretary Dominic Raab, who quit the government in opposition to May’s agreement with the EU, said a no-deal Brexit would have “short-term risks,” but they would be “manageable.” International Trade Secretary Liam Fox wrote in the Sunday Telegraph that “failure to deliver Brexit would produce a yawning gap between Parliament and the people, a schism in our political system with unknowable consequences.” He said public anger could trigger “a political tsunami.” May has spent the last few days meeting government and opposition lawmakers, and is due to report to Parliament Monday on how she plans to alter the rejected deal. The talks have produced few signs that May plans to make radical changes. Lawmakers who want a softer Brexit are preparing to try to amend May’s plans in a Jan. 29 debate, and to use parliamentary rules to try to prevent a “no-deal” Brexit and take control of the exit process. Speaking on the BBC, Fox said that “Parliament has not got the right to hijack the Brexit process.” But Starmer said there was a roadblock in the way of a solution to the Brexit crisis, “and that roadblock is the prime minister.” “Her mind is closed,” he said.

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