John Dean replies to Trump's 'rat' tweet

    Summary
    President Nixon's White House counsel John Dean responds to President Trump calling him a 'rat' on Twitter.

    How the Clinton sex scandal shaped Brett Kavanaugh

    Summary
    Whether he was strategizing ways to pin down President Bill Clinton on his sexual indiscretions or charting the end of the whole independent counsel investigation, Brett Kavanaugh took a bold approach.

    Opinion: What the Asia Argento sexual assault allegations tell us

    Summary
    On Sunday, The New York Times reported that Italian actress Asia Argento, whose allegations that she was sexually assaulted by Harvey Weinstein helped launch the #MeToo movement, has been accused of sexual assault herself.

    The real reason Trump can't stand the Russia probe

    Summary
    Over the weekend, we learned that White House counsel Don McGahn spent 30 hours talking to special counsel Robert Mueller's office about the ongoing investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election, the possibility of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russians and the idea that Donald Trump himself may have sought to obstruct the investigation.

    Pilot suspended in connection with social media comments on transgender student

    Summary
    Frontier Airlines has suspended a pilot over Facebook comments he is accused of making about a transgender student, officials said Monday. The posts were among several that led a rural Oklahoma school district to close for two days last week.

    Asia Argento 'accused of sexual assault'

    Summary
    Italian actress and #MeToo accuser reportedly reached a settlement with a man 20 years her junior.

    Greek bailout: Five numbers that reshaped the country

    Summary
    The story of Greece in five numbers as it emerges from its eurozone bailout programme.

    Italy bridge collapse: CCTV shows moment disaster struck

    Summary
    Images from two angles on a nearby building show the moment the motorway bridge came down.

    Eight hikers killed in flash flooding in southern Italy

    Summary
    Heavy rains flooded a stream in a gorge popular with walkers in southern Italy.

    US dog walker killed in South Carolina alligator attack

    Summary
    Witnesses say the 45-year-old was attacked while protecting her dog from an 8ft alligator.

    Measles warning to holidaymakers as European cases soar

    Summary
    Holidaymakers are being reminded to ensure they are vaccinated against measles after European cases soared to an eight-year high.

    Chelsea Clinton: I definitely may run for office

    Summary
    Chelsea Clinton has said she has not ruled out running for office in the future - although she is not interested in getting into politics for now.

    At least 14 dead after raids on Rio drug gangs

    Summary
    At least 14 people have died after Brazil's military swooped on drug gangs in Rio de Janeiro.

    Apple store evacuated 'after iPad explodes'

    Summary
    An Apple store in the Netherlands was evacuated after an iPad battery exploded and released noxious fumes into the air, according to reports.

    India asks UK to extradite celebrity jeweller over 'fraud'

    Summary
    Indian authorities are asking Britain to extradite billionaire jeweller Nirav Modi, who is allegedly at the centre of a £1.3bn bank fraud.

    Trump, Asia Argento, Elon Musk: Your Monday Evening Briefing

    Summary
    Here’s what you need to know at the end of the day.

    U.S. Criticism of ‘Suspected’ Nuclear Sites May Derail Talks, North Korean Media Warns

    Summary
    North Korean officials urged President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to push aside hard-liners and move ahead with diplomacy.

    Measles in Europe, Recently at Record Low, Jumps to Highest Level Since ’90s

    Summary
    A combination of complacency, instability and opposition to vaccination contributes to lagging immunization rates in many countries.

    ‘We Cannot Afford This’: Malaysia Pushes Back on China’s Big Projects

    Summary
    A country that once courted Chinese investment now fears becoming overly indebted for projects that are neither viable nor necessary — except to China.

    Britain Takes Over a Private Prison Steeped in Filth and Violence

    Summary
    Staff with the security firm G4S locked themselves in offices for their own safety while blood, vomit and rat droppings littered the hallways, the government says.

    Two arrested for allegedly spying for Iran in U.S.

    Summary
    Two Iranian men were indicted on Monday for allegedly spying for Tehran in the United States, including conducting surveillance at a Jewish facility and gathering information on backers of the militant Iranian opposition Mujahideen-e Khalq, the Justice Department said.

    Brazil poll excluding Lula shows far-right candidate holding lead

    Summary
    Brazil's far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro holds a solid lead in the race for October's presidential election in a new survey on Monday by pollster Ibope, when excluding jailed leftist candidate Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

    London tube station shooting injures three people: police

    Summary
    A shooting at London's Kingsbury tube station has left three people injured, police said on Monday night, adding that the shooting is "not terror related."

    Twelve dead as Brazilian soldiers, police swarm Rio slums in anti-drug assaults

    Summary
    At least five civilians and one soldier died in shootouts in northern Rio de Janeiro on Monday, the army said, as thousands of Brazilian soldiers swept into slums in pursuit of drug gangs, trapping terrified residents in their homes.

    Freed Mexico teachers' union boss attacks education reforms

    Summary
    The former leader of Mexico's influential teachers union made a combative comeback to public life on Monday after being let off corruption charges, by attacking the outgoing government in a speech and claiming its education reform had failed.

    Melania Trump traveling solo to Africa later this year

    Summary
    It is her first big solo international trip

    Families reunited for first time since Korean War

    Summary
    The reunion came after dozens of elderly South Koreans crossed the border into North Korea to meet with their relatives

    Accused spy in U.S. facing borderline "torture," Russian embassy says

    Summary
    The Russian Embassy in Washington says U.S. officials are trying to "break" Maria Butina by humiliating her and placing her under "psychological pressure"

    Measles cases skyrocket in Europe, killing dozens

    Summary
    Over 41,000 cases of measles were reported in the first half of 2018 – more than all of the previous year

    Malaysian police hunt for missing radioactive material: Reports

    Summary
    Authorities fear device could fall into the hands of militants and be used to make a dirty bomb, local media says

    Review: The new All My Friends festival had star power to spare. Now, to lock in its audience.

    Summary
    As the sun fell on the last Sunday sets of the first All My Friends festival, it was clear that there’s a hunger for this kind of show in central L.A. — a smaller-capacity event that’s urbane and accessible, and maybe a little hipper than its predecessor Hard Summer, perhaps a little reminiscent...

    Investigan reporte que dice que Asia Argento abusó sexualmente de un actor adolescente

    Summary
    El Departamento del Sheriff del Condado de Los Ángeles dijo el lunes que están contactando a un joven actor y a su abogado después de que el New York Times informara que la actriz y directora, Asia Argento, le pagó recientemente por un supuesto encuentro sexual en un hotel de Marina del Rey cuando...

    Surf's up forever in California as surfing becomes the official state sport

    Summary

    Proposal that would place restrictions on plastic straws advances in California Legislature

    Summary

    Michigan official faces manslaughter trial over Flint deaths

    Summary
    A judge on Monday ordered Michigan's state health director to stand trial for involuntary manslaughter in two deaths linked to Legionnaires' disease in the Flint area, the highest ranking official to stand trial as a result of the tainted water scandal. Nick Lyon is accused of failing to issue...

    Paul Manafort trial: Jury ends third day of deliberations in financial fraud case of former Trump campaign chairman

    Summary
    Manafort jury ends Day 3 of deliberations; jurors' names to remain under seal.

    Packers' Clay Matthews hoping 'big year' helps him stay in Green Bay

    Summary
    Clay Matthews would like to think he isn’t entering his final season with the Packers, but the 32-year-old outside linebacker knows it’s a possible.

    Woman killed by alligator at Sea Pines in Hilton Head Island, S.C.

    Summary
    A 45-year-old woman was killed Monday while trying to protect her dog from an alligator at the golf and marina community in South Carolina.

    Salah sets up 2 goals, Liverpool beats Palace 2-0 in EPL

    Summary
    Mohamed Salah won a first-half penalty converted by James Milner and also played in Sadio Mane for a late goal as Liverpool beat 10-man Crystal Palace 2-0 on Monday for its second straight win to open the Premier League season

    Weinstein accuser Asia Argento allegedly paid off sex assault accuser

    Summary
    Prominent Harvey Weinstein accuser and MeToo advocate, Asia Argento, allegedly paid off a young actor who accused her of sexually assaulting him.

    The White House’s Top Lawyer Met With Robert Mueller’s Team. Here’s What His Predecessors Think

    Summary
    The news that top White House lawyer Don McGahn has met with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team may have raised eyebrows among close watchers of the Russia investigation, but his predecessors in the job say the cooperation itself is not that unusual. Three former White House counsels told TIME that because the job entails representing the office of the presidency — and not the individual currently holding it — it’s perfectly logical that he would meet with a special counsel investigating it. Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, who served as White House counsel from 2001 to 2005, said that was the first thing he said to President George W. Bush when a special prosecutor was appointed to investigate the leaking of CIA agent Valerie Plame’s identity in 2003. “I specifically told President Bush, ‘anything you told me is not going to be protected by attorney-client privilege because you are not my client,” Gonzales recounted. “We got him private counsel in connection with that investigation.” In that case, Gonzales ended up testifying before a grand jury. (The grand jury did not charge anyone with the leak, but did charge Scooter Libby, who was Chief of Staff to former Vice President Dick Cheney, with obstruction of justice. Trump pardoned Libby this past April. “Don McGahn testifying, as well as any other White House employee testifying, is what should be expected,” Gonzales said. “There is no attorney-client privilege … Don McGahn did what he had to do. He was requested by the special counsel to provide information and he cooperated.” In a tweet responding to a New York *Times* story about McGahn’s cooperation, President Donald Trump argued that Mcgann’s “giving hours of testimony” did not mean that he was a “John Dean type ‘RAT,'” a reference to a White House lawyer for Richard Nixon whose testimony about Watergate helped lead to the end of his presidency. The failing @nytimes wrote a Fake piece today implying that because White House Councel Don McGahn was giving hours of testimony to the Special Councel, he must be a John Dean type “RAT.” But I allowed him and all others to testify – I didn’t have to. I have nothing to hide…… — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 19, 2018 Peter Wallison, who was White House counsel for President Ronald Reagan during the Iran-Contra investigation, said that cooperating with a special counsel does not necessarily mean providing damaging information. In fact, he argued that McGahn’s cooperation might even be a sign that Trump is not in as much legal jeopardy as some of his critics assume. “This is a strong indication that the White House and the president, despite what the president has been saying that always makes things look more dramatic then they are, are not concerned about the Mueller investigation finding things that put the president in jeopardy,” he said. Wallison testified before an independent prosecutor who was investigation Iran-Contra, a decision he believed was crucial to proving Reagan’s innocence in knowledge of the events. Regardless of whether it helps Trump or hurts him, the three former White House counsels agreed that McGahn was doing his duty. Jack Quinn, who was White House Counsel for Bill Clinton from 1995 to 1997, said Kenneth Starr, who helmed the independent investigation into Clinton’s real estate ventures that ultimately led to the Monica Lewinsky revelations and his subsequent impeachment, never requested to meet with him but he would have complied. “Everyone whose a lawyer in the government represents the government. You represent the United States, you don’t represent the head of your agency,” he said. “You have an obligation to the government, to the people of the United States.”

    Runaway Goats May Have Caused the First Cute Subway Delay Ever

    Summary
    Two runaway goats wandering the tracks of the New York City subway created unexpected delays for commuters on Monday morning. The goats were spotted roaming between the Fort Hamilton Parkway and 8th Avenue stops on the N line in Brooklyn just before 11 a.m. And while they initially didn’t disrupt M.T.A. service, their progress eventually forced southbound N trains to be diverted to the D line. “A new one for us (we think): Two goats are roaming along the N line tracks in Brooklyn,” the NYCT subway tweeted after being alerted to the goats’ presence. “They’re safe and not currently affecting service, but they are on the run. We’ll keep you posted.” Two very baaaaad boys. pic.twitter.com/3fcb9QCxGh — NYCT Subway (@NYCTSubway) August 20, 2018 The saga came to an end around 1 p.m. when the two “baaaaaad boys” were tranquilized and captured. “UPDATE: goats in custody – tranquilized and still snoozing when our officers handed them over to specialists at Animal Care Center,” NYPD transit tweeted.

    Record-Setting Runner Disqualified for Not Drinking Enough Beer

    Summary
    Corey Bellemore thought he had won last weekend’s’s 2018 Beer Mile World Classic in Vancouver, B.C. with a shockingly fast time of 4 minutes and 24 seconds. Unfortunately for Bellemore, however, who holds a 2017 record in running the fastest “beer mile” in the world — that means running a mile with four stops to chug four beers — judges ruled that he didn’t quite consume enough liquor to keep his winning title this time around. According to *Runner’s Wold*, Bellemore and two other runners ultimately left behind “more than the permitted amount” of beer. One presumes they were so busy trying to keep up the pace that in their haste to chug the beer, they didn’t quite complete the task at hand. Bellemore was disqualified by just half an ounce, according to the Beer Mile Twitter account. His response on social media? “Never rush through life,” he tweeted. “Better luck next time!” Ultimately, runner-up Dale Clutterbuck claimed the winning title this time around. But we can all take Bellemore’s previous advice, shared after he broke the 2017 beer mile world record: “chug fast, burp and breathe.” Just don’t chug *too* fast. Beer miles, Runner’s World notes, are fairly secretive events, since organizers have to avoid restrictive open container laws. Runners chug a 12-ounce can or bottle of beer between four laps. In the case of vomiting, extra laps are prescribed as penalties. Not a sport for the faint-hearted. 4:24.44 – *ALMOST*. If you watch one video today, make it this one. Corey Bellemore dropped a 4:24 beer mile, but was DQ'd by only 1/2 oz. Dale Clutterbuck takes his first World Classic title in 4:50! https://t.co/4yXUwGEBGQ… https://t.co/7tmT7PYQoX — BeerMile.com (@beermile) August 14, 2018 Never rush through life 🤣 better luck next time! https://t.co/oNmWZ47V8p — Corey Bellemore (@CoreyBellemore) August 17, 2018

    Why It Is Time for All U.S. Bishops to Resign

    Summary
    For some time, many members of Catholic Church may have believed that the worst of the clerical abuse crisis was in the past. This certainly has been the Church’s intent, at least in word. But now the spotlight has returned, with the grand jury report from six Pennsylvania dioceses, which found from 70 years of documents that over 300 priests abused more than 1,000 victims — in addition to scandals involving the former Cardinal Archbishop of Washington, D.C., in the U.K., Australia, Peru and Chile, and on the verge of papal visit to Ireland, which suffered some of the worst of the worldwide priestly abuse. The head of the United Sates’ bishops conference has appealed to the Vatican for external assistance in conducting a blanket investigation into the continued blight of the clerical abuse crisis across the U.S. “We already know that one root cause is the failure of episcopal leadership,” Cardinal Daniel DiNardo stated. “The result was that scores of beloved children of God were abandoned to face an abuse of power alone. This is a moral catastrophe.” While DiNardo is right about the catastrophe, his solution does not go far enough. Pope Francis set out to make tackling he abuse crisis one of his foremost priorities upon election in 2013, significantly breaking with his two immediate predecessors. Having previously advocated a policy of zero-tolerance to clerical abuse as archbishop in Buenos Aries, he continued with the same resolve as the Bishop of Rome and Supreme Pontiff across the world’s Catholics. He quickly established a papal commission in 2014 to explore the whole range of factors and issues pertaining to the abuse crisis and to establish policies to ensure it is a stain of social sin that is removed from the church as far as possible once and for all. And yet something went wrong. As that commission’s work unfolded, it met roadblocks from within the Vatican itself. Its own recommendations were not being implemented, and communications by victims to leading Vatican departments were being ignored. It was denied vital resources to carry out its work. Irishwoman Marie Collins, a prominent survivor and member of the commission eventually resigned in protest. All of this happened before Peru and Chile and the latest U.S. revelations. Francis himself made a startling error in defending one of the Chilean bishops before perhaps knowing the full facts. The root and branch changes needed by the church — establishing genuine checks and balances, along with processes of accountability, transparency and truthfulness — have thus still yet to take place. And the suspicion lingers in many countries that even the child-protection processes introduced are part smokescreen used by the Church to be seen as if it were doing something, part insurance requirements and part forced upon the church by secular authorities. In all too many instances, it at times appeared as if the situation was being tackled as an issue of media crisis-management first and foremost. *It was also* not a coincidence that bishops who lived continents apart, independently and in ignorance of one another, settled upon exactly the same shameful *modus operandi* in the face of abusive priests. This happened because guidelines on the very issue of abuse issued by Rome in 2001, 1962 and 1922 demanded secrecy as a matter of course. It was policy to keep the activities of abuser priests and members of religious orders from coming to light in the public domain. That policy was central to an institutional culture of putting the institution’s reputation above the welfare of its members and the victims of its ministers. That culture still lingers within too many bishops worldwide and even amongst some Vatican officials. This is the problem with Cardinal DiNardo asking the Vatican to come and investigate the U.S. Catholic Church. At the core of the cover-ups lie policies that were rolled out worldwide by previous Vatican administrative departments and officials themselves — and are still, it would seem, defended by some in Rome as elsewhere. If the Vatican’s own papal commission on these issues has floundered amidst resignations, then there are clearly still deep-seated institutional malaises at the church’s core, of which the abuse crisis is but sadly an acute symptom. Those potentially infected by a morally malignant institutional culture are not best suited to investigate the same failings elsewhere. The church itself has a term for this, it is “social sin.” This is not simply a series of individual moral failings. It is a crisis of moral corrosion and corruption embedded into the church. Values and virtues have become suppressed — even by those who teach and promote them. For instance, earlier this year, the U.S. bishops yet again resisted calls for greater episcopal accountability, a resistance witnessed all too prevalently throughout the church elsewhere. Cardinal DiNardo spoke of rebuilding trust. To such an end, as a beginning, there would be no better and more effective step than for the U.S. bishops to do what they should have done over 15 years ago: make a collective public act of repentance and then resign *en masse*, as those of Chile did in the wake of their own revelations in May. This would help allow fully transparent investigations that have independent authority to proceed so that it can be determined which bishops’ resignations are best accepted and which bishops have proved to be beyond reproach in fighting the culture of secrecy and moral bankruptcy. And if they don’t do this on their own, Pope Francis should demand it. He should then overhaul the papal commission investigating the abuse crisis, appointing independent lay leadership that will in turn — independently — appoint all additional members. Clerics won’t end the pernicious culture of clericalism that has allowed this crisis to persist and for bishops to evade responsibility and accountability across so many decades. *The pontiff’s Aug. 20 letter* denouncing the moral failings of the cover-ups once again and pledging solidarity in taking the side of the victims is very welcome. What he states about transforming ecclesial culture is a call, in effect, to dismantle the church’s centralized hierarchical system of governance and for the greater participation of all the faithful in transforming the church for the better. It is what so many people have been asking for across many decades now. But, with the greatest respect, calling for prayer and fasting in response to this grave crisis, as the pope also did, is not sufficient. Words are not enough and never have been enough. The Church is bound by its own social and moral teachings to do so much more. The time has come for radical action. Only if the church can openly own its own faults, and address its institutional, structural and organizational failings, can it genuinely begin to truly bear testimony to the gospel. The church will and should be judged by its own standards within, as much as what it does to promote justice without. Pope Francis opened and closed his letter by quoting Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. But Paul, in that letter, also denounced church leaders who were so bound up with their own self-importance — and the morally corrupt ways of the world — that they neglected the gospel. We have witnessed such arrogance all too often in response to the abuse crisis. Let that come to an end now.

    Why President Trump Couldn’t Have Stopped the White House Counsel From Talking to the Mueller Investigation

    Summary
    The media are buzzing over the fact that White House counsel Don McGahn has spent some 30 hours talking to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team, and, as the New York *Times* revealed, President Donald Trump’s team does not know what he was asked and what he said. Indeed, according to the *Times*, after the initial Mueller-McGahn meeting, the President’s lawyers did not even inquire. Logically, McGahn would have much to say on the subject of obstruction of justice. Recall that Trump reportedly instructed him to fire Mueller, and he refused to do so. Presumably, from his post in the White House, McGahn also might have extensive information about the delay in firing National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, such as what the President knew and when he learned it. That may also apply to the Trump Tower meeting between high-ranking Trump campaign officials and Russians. In an effort to turn lemons into lemonade, Trump has taken credit for permitting McGahn to talk freely to the Mueller team. “I allowed him and all others to testify,” the President said in one of several tweets. “I didn’t have to. I have nothing to hide.” That storyline has been supported in interviews by his addled personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who asserts that the McGahn revelations are good for Trump for two reasons: First, Giuliani argued that McGahn said things only helpful to Trump. But when pressed, Rudy confessed he had no first-hand knowledge of what McGahn told Mueller — and all he knows is that a former personal lawyer for Trump said all was okay. Second, Giuliani, a former U.S. Attorney, also argued that the facts were so exculpatory for the President that Trump allowed McGahn to tell all, and therefore the President declined to invoke either executive privilege or the attorney-client privilege to keep McGahn from spilling the beans. Ha! To begin with: There is no executive privilege in a criminal investigation except for military or diplomatic matters. The Supreme Court made that clear by its unanimous decision requiring Richard Nixon to give a grand jury the White House tapes that ultimately led to his resignation. And second, the D.C. Circuit, in an opinion the Supreme Court has refused to review, has definitively held there was no attorney-client privilege between White House Counsel and President Bill Clinton that would protect advice or documents in Ken Starr’s criminal investigation, because White House counsel are not personal lawyers to the President. In effect, McGahn does not have the same status as Giuliani. The Court wrote: “With respect to investigations of Federal criminal offenses, and especially offenses committed by those in Government, Government attorneys stand in a far different position from members of the private bar. Their duty is not to defend clients against criminal charges and it is not to protect wrongdoers from public exposure. The constitutional responsibility of the President, and all members of the executive branch, is to ‘take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed.’” Simply put, the Court unambiguously ruled: “When an executive branch attorney is called before a Federal grand jury to give evidence about alleged crimes within the executive branch, … the attorney shall provide that evidence.” President Trump’s tweets and Giuliani’s totally misleading and newly manufactured statements of the law are all false. The President did not volunteer to let McGahn talk to Mueller. The President lacked the power to stop him.

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